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Determine what Group Policy has my Computer Info

Posted on 2012-04-03
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Last Modified: 2012-04-09
All client computers on our domain have a security group added as a local admin.  For security reasons I want to remove my computer.  How can I determine what policy holds this information and how should I go about removing my system?
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Question by:iNetSystem
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5 Comments
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Anuroopsundd
ID: 37801916
you can check by running gpresult or rsop command.
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Expert Comment

by:jmanishbabu
ID: 37801934
gpresult /v will list you the member of security group .
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Author Comment

by:iNetSystem
ID: 37802014
Should I look at what groups my user account is a member of our my computer name?  From that what next?
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Mike Kline earned 250 total points
ID: 37802100
In GPMC you can also run an RSoP report (see screenshot).  It is most likely going to be a setting using restricted groups

RSoP GPMC
Thanks

Mike
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Assisted Solution

by:DrDave242
DrDave242 earned 250 total points
ID: 37802450
Once you determine which GPO is assigning the user to the local admin group, you can exempt your machine from it by changing the security settings on the GPO as follows:

NOTE:  By following these steps, you will be preventing the GPO in question from applying to your system; any settings that are applied by that GPO will no longer be applied.  Therefore, only follow these steps if you are sure that all of the settings in the GPO are not needed.  Obviously, if you determine that the restricted-group setting is being applied by the Default Domain Policy, you don't want to follow these steps.

In Group Policy Management, expand Group Policy Objects in the left pane and select the appropriate GPO.
In the right pane, select the Delegation tab and click the Advanced button in the lower-right corner.
Click Add, then click Object Types and check the Computers box.  Click OK, then enter the name of your machine.
Click "Check Names" to make sure the computer account is located, then click OK.
Select your machine account in the list of group and user names.  In the permissions pane, scroll down to "Apply group policy" and check the Deny box.
Click OK, then run gpupdate /force from an administrative command prompt on your machine.
Run gpresult /R from the same prompt to verify that the GPO in question is no longer applied.  Its status should say "Denied (Security)."
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