MySQL database usage

Hi,

I am using a shared hosting for mysql and the databases are enlarging 0,5 MB per day.

1. What is the optimum size of the database? 10MB, 50MB or 500MB? Since I can chunk the database to smaller ones but I don't want to create a lot because of maintenance issues.
2. In mysql cpanel there is a limit of 50MB for file size to import. Is this a criteria?
4. Some tables are very big. 1 of the 20 tables has the 70% of the data volume. Is this a problem?
tyuretAsked:
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arnoldCommented:
The amount of space the database takes within the filesystem is not a determinative as to whether the database setup is optimal.
It all depends what is in the data. I.e. storing binary data such as files, images, etc in the database versus within the filesystem would to be an indication that it might not be optimal design. Files, binary data should be stored within the filesystem while the path should be stored in the databaase/filename.
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tyuretAuthor Commented:
So if  responds to queries fast enough, it is not important  to have  let's say 1GB size?
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arnoldCommented:
No, the database should be organized to maximize info while minimize space utilization on the lie system.  You should have access to phpmyadmin which may help you further tune the performance by suggesting addition of indexes, and/or resolve issues with long running queries every so often. Etc.
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virmaiorCommented:
Arnold is exactly right.  There is no way to judge whether a database is well-designed just based on its size.  

On one level, tyuret's comment is exactly right -- as long as it is querying fast enough, it works.

But really the question is whether the data is organized in an optimal way for the application. At a basic level, don't repeatedly store a string value. Instead, reference it by an integer to another table.

Where partitioning starts to matter is for giant applications where the data to be desired is going to be segmented (i.e. most searches in Japanese would go to a Japanese-language DB vs. Chinese to a Chinese one).
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MySQL Server

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