Licenses (CAL's) for additional Microsoft Windows Server 2008

I have one Windows Server 2003 with 35 CAL for users in local network. There is a Microsoft domain on server (Domain Controller) and server is also a file server. I'm purchasing a new Windows Standard 2008 R2 Server. New server will be also DC and file server for those same 35 users. Do I have to by 35 CAL's for new server or not ?
infos-splitAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

muzzammilhussainCommented:
You can contact Microsoft Authorised Distributors in your region and ask from them:

https://partner.microsoft.com/global/40014697

You can also call Microsoft and speak to the licensing team:

https://emea.microsoftstore.com/UK/en-GB/Contact-Us
0
CSIPComputingCommented:
Here's an extract from an MSDN article about CALs here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mssmallbiz/archive/2007/11/06/5942350.aspx

Multiple servers in domain: Microsoft server CALs can be used to access multiple servers of the same kind throughout your domain. For instance, if you have a Windows Server 2003 Device CAL for a workstation, that Windows Server 2003 CAL gives that workstation the rights to access any Windows Server 2003 throughout the domain, not just a single Windows Server 2003.

HOWEVER:

Version numbers matter: Just like the Server products that CALs are associated with, they have version numbers. For instance, for Windows Server 2003, there is a Windows Server 2003 license and there are Windows Server 2003 CALs.

The version number of the CALs being used to access the server software must be the same or higher than the version of the Server software running. As an example, if you were to purchase a license of Windows Server 2008 to replace your Windows Server 2003 and install that in your company, your Windows Server 2003 CALs would no longer have rights to access the server running Windows Server 2008, since the 2008 version is newer than the 2003 version.

Note: You can purchase newer CALs to access older server versions. For instance, a Windows Server 2008 CAL can be used to access a Windows 2003 server since the CAL version is newer than the Server version.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
clinker83Commented:
0
Acronis True Image 2019 just released!

Create a reliable backup. Make sure you always have dependable copies of your data so you can restore your entire system or individual files.

CSIPComputingCommented:
In other words, yes, as you are installing a HIGHER version than the CALs you have now, you need to replace all your CALs, and these will cover both servers.
0
CSIPComputingCommented:
clinker83: New CALs are required because the server versions are different.  The article you refer to involves two servers of the same version, and as such, servers of the same version are covered by the same CALs.

infos-split has 2003 CALs at the moment, but is installing Server 2008 R2, therefore 2008 R2 Cals are required.
0
clinker83Commented:
Ah yes, thanks CSIPComputing
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows Server 2008

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.