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isp

Posted on 2012-04-04
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Last Modified: 2012-04-05
I work at an office on which I do accounting and I'm being asked by the owner, since I'm somehow the I.T. guy, to cordinate to switch out our ISP provider.  Before we just had a T1 connection which went from a jack in our phone run to a switch, but now since a new provider is coming on board and were getting rid of the old one, I'm supposed to get a router.  As I understand this, physical mentally, I was told that we are supposed to go from a model over to a router and then to the present switch we presently have.  I was also given about five IP's which I'm not sure why or how to configure them.  

Can someone assist in understanding this concept and also mention as to how to go about this?
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Question by:vulture71
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Expert Comment

by:Jason Johanknecht
ID: 37807044
It sounds like you are referring to DSL connection.  The ISP may provide you with a modem/router appliance.  The 5 IP addresses are Public IP and visible to the world.  You could alternatively use 1 Public IP and route internet to all workstations on Private IP range like 192.168.1.XXX    

Is this a DSL connection like AT&T?
How many computers are on the network?
How secure are you looking to have the network?
Do you require wireless connections?
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Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 37807457
"I was also given about five IP's which I'm not sure why or how to configure them.  "

I'm going to assume that these are public IP addresses.  Just to be sure, can you say what they are please? Should be no harm in that as you will have to protect them from random or semi-knowledgeable access anyway.  

Why do you have multiple public IP addresses?  Surely not just by chance.
What would you use multiple IP addresses for?  Your network internet access would be one.  Public servers of various kinds would be others.  Stand-alone VPN devices would be another.

I can answer your question based on two different scenarios.  Still a lot can depend on the ISP and how they intend to deliver the service and the addresses (so to speak).

" we are supposed to go from a model over to a router and then to the present switch we presently have"

OK.  This sounds like the simplest scenario where you really don't need more than one public IP address.  Just one for your network.  
Either the modem will have a built-in router or it won't.
If it doesn't then it will deliver a public IP address to the router it's connected to.  Either that address will be obtained "automatically" via DHCP or you will have to manually enter one of the ones you've been given.  The modem "inside" port may also take up one that you've been given.  How the modem is set up should be something the ISP will tell you - or at least they should be able to tell you how to configure the "outside" "internet side"  of your router.  

Then the switch can be connected to the LAN side of the router.

You may well find that a simple commodity router will do the job.
***************************

But, what if you need more public IP addresses?  This would be the "other" scenario.

In this case you would provide an "internet switch" .. just a simple switch will do.
Connect this switch to the modem.
Connect all devices needing a public address to this switch as well.
Assign your public addresses to each of those devices in whatever manner is suitable.  Note that the modem may be using one of those assigned to you.
The modem address will most likely be the gateway address for those devices if one is needed.  Some devices do, some don't.
One of those devices will be the router.  From there it's the same as the first scenario.
Other devices with public addresses could be servers, vpn devices, etc.  But this sounds like more than you're trying to accomplish.
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Author Comment

by:vulture71
ID: 37808062
There are 10 pc's.  How do set this up on the router?  What ip do I give the router?  Do I need to configure dns, gateway, anything else?  First time doing this.
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Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 37808894
The router will have a public IP address on the WAN/Internet side which, as described before, will get set according to how the ISP does things.

The router will have a LAN side IP address like 192.168.1.1 on a subnet 192.168.1.0 / 24 or 255.255.255.0.

The router will have DHCP turned on - usually by default.
Other computers can be set up to "get an IP address automatically" and the router will pass out addresses to them.

Beyond that, what router model is it?
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Expert Comment

by:Jason Johanknecht
ID: 37808968
What type of internet service are you getting?  Who is the ISP?
This will make a difference in suggesting a good router for you.
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Author Comment

by:vulture71
ID: 37809657
This is how I connected my new wifi router, physically...

from the new modem I have an ethernet connection going to the internet port on the wifi router and then from the router's port 1 going to our network switch.  Would this be properly set.  I changed the default username and password on the router and also needed to change some printers ip and default gateways.  I also disabled the option to broadcast the name of the wifi.  As far as security, Is this properly set or is there something missing?
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Accepted Solution

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Fred Marshall earned 500 total points
ID: 37812519
"from the new modem I have an ethernet connection going to the internet port on the wifi router"

Yes.  That much is correct.

But, you did not say anything about the IP addresses.  You do not want the subnet on the internet side of the router to be the same as the subnet of the LAN side of the router.  You should be able to provide those addresses without any issue and we can help with that.
That is: if the internet side address is something like 192.168.1.xxx then you would want the LAN side addresses to be something like 192.168.0.xxx or vice versa .. just not the same.

"from the router's port 1 going to our network switch"

Yes.  That would be reasonable.

" I changed the default username and password on the router"

You just need to be clear which this is.  Often there is confusion between the wireless login and the wireless *box* login.  If it's the box then, yes that's good practice.

"I also disabled the option to broadcast the name of the wifi.  As far as security, Is this properly set or is there something missing?"

Actually that's not much help re: security.  It's easy to see that there's a nonbroadcasting access point if one is at all interested in such things.  What you really want is to set up security with WPA2-PSK or maybe it's called WPA2 Personal .. something like that.  
Then make the passphrase something like CoMpLiCaTeD8251 if you see what I mean here.  Or, you might go to a website for a full 63-character random sequence that you would save then copy and paste when setting up a computer.  The latter is very secure and hardly much harder than giving out a passphrase on a piece of paper.

" also needed to change some printers ip and default gateways."

This may not be necessary if you don't change the LAN subnet.  And you want to make sure that the router DHCP range doesn't overlap with any static/manual addresses you have set up.
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Expert Comment

by:Fred Marshall
ID: 37812540
I should have added: Turning off the wireless SSID makes it harder for everyone to connect - your guests as well as strangers.  The thing is, it's not that hard for the determined stranger and is still harder for your guests.  So, I would leave it turned on.  Lots of wireless interface software behaves better that way.
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