SQL Server remove trailing spaces in table fields

Is there a way to remove the trailing spaces in fields in a sql server table? I don't mean using rtrim or something like that for viewing. I want to permanently remove any trailing white space in the fields of various tables. I have a lot of records and fields, so doing it one record at a time manually is not possible. I'm trying to find out if it is possible. I'm using SQL Server 2005. Thanks.
dodgerfanAsked:
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Patrick TallaricoDecision Support and Systems AnalystCommented:
can you update the fields in the table using rtrim?

Update table
set column = rtrim(column),
     column2=rtrim(column2)
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dqmqCommented:
update yourtable
   set
     yourcolumn1 = rtrim(yourcolumn1)
  ,  yourcolumn2 = rtrim(yourcolumn2)


The above could be automated across a table, database, or server, but it is probably easier to do just do it manually with copy/paste into a TSQL script.
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tliottaCommented:
If you want to exclude something like rtrim(), then I don't understand what you mean.

That is, I would use an UPDATE statement that set the value of a column to be the value of rtrim(<column>).

Of course, that assumes that the column is VCHAR in the first place. If not, then I'd alter the column data type first; then I'd UPDATE to set the values.

Can you clarify if you're excluding rtrim() or if it's just the use of rtrim() for retrieval/viewing?

Tom
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Patrick TallaricoDecision Support and Systems AnalystCommented:
I could be wrong, but I think @dodgerfan was speaking only of the fact that when used in a View, rtrim, doesn't affect a change onto the actual table.  When used in an update statement, rtrim() should work just fine for @dodgerfan.

@dodgerfan, please let me know if I am off on this train of thought.
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tliottaCommented:
Yep, we probably see it the same way. But every once in a while, someone asks a question like this and actually has a surprising reason behind it. I usually learn something from those reasons. I've turned a little cautious just in case.

Tom
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Patrick TallaricoDecision Support and Systems AnalystCommented:
@tliotta, I definitely agree.  I wasn't intending to downplay your comment.  In addition, it's a good comment to check the data type.  I often forget to ask that question.  Thanks for the reminder.
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dodgerfanAuthor Commented:
I apologize for not getting back to this earlier, and for the confusion. I was speaking of using RTRIM in a view. I have no idea why I never thought of using it in an update statement. I've already tested it and it works great. Thanks for help.
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Microsoft SQL Server 2005

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