AD / DNS changes

So to give a little background on the setup, the previous IT guy configured the Active Directory name as site1.mycompany.com and he assumed that the second site would be site2.mycompany.com and so on. I guess he had a problem with that so now all 4 office locations are under the DNS site1.mycompany.com and the root domain for the company is site1.mycompany.com. So any server or workstation (regardless of which physical site it's at) is name as follows:
site1_server.site1.mycompany.com
site2_server.site1.mycompany.com
site3_workstation.site1.mycompany.com
and so on

Each site has a domain controller, local file server, DHCP and DNS servers. For the most part things seem to be working OK, but there are odd "slownesses" when logging in or opening local shares at the remote offices. The main site, where the original and primary DC resides, everything works perfect, it's the remote offices that act funny which makes me believe it's caused by the odd way things were configured. Most of the DC's are server 2008, so the functional level is still at 2003.

So what I would like to do, if it's even possible with out starting over from scratch, is the following:

change the primary domain to mycompany.local.

have each site have it's own secondary zone, site1.mycompany.local, site2.mycompany.local and so on.

do this without rebuilding all of the group policies i've worked so hard to clean up

finally and probably the most important, do this without effecting normal work.

is any of these even possible?

Thanks a lot.
mcjim2kAsked:
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Darius GhassemConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Well you can keep site1.company.com but then create Sites with AD Sites this will fix the weird slowness issues the reason is that the computers are not locating their local DCs. Without Sites setup then DNS will not be able too determine what the closets DC is for those clients systems.

You can rename the domain with a domain rename http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc738208(v=ws.10).aspx

No point on creating secondary zones you should keep everything under the mycompany.com domain. The key here is to create AD Sites.
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Leon FesterSenior Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Slow response from those remote branches could be because it cannot find a DC in it's site.
A loose translation but: Sites are configured as authentication and replication boundaries.
If the users are on a specific IP and there is a DC on that network, then that DC should reside in the site that has the subnet defined.

Make sure that each site has the correct subnet attached in AD Sites and Services, then move the corresponding DC into that site too.

Ideally you'd want to do this on the server holding the Infrastructure Master role...reduces the amount of wait time for domain synchronization.

P.S. Are your DC's currently replicating correctly?
Run DCDIAG on each DC to check the health of AD.
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mcjim2kAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the response. The DCs seem to be replicating just fine and all of the sites are setup properly with their own subnets and DCs assigned to each.

For this particular question, I'd like to focus on the possibility of renaming the domain and reconfiguring the secondary DNS zones.
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