weather patterns in clear sky in night

if there is a very clear night and you can see the moon distinctly.. does it rule out every aspect of rough or unpleasant weather patters? (no rain/snow/hails/sleet etc)

thanks
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25112Asked:
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
Well ofcourse if there is a VERY CLEAR skt, it will NOT rain/snow/sleet/hail :D That needs clouds
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d-glitchCommented:
I agree.  A clear sky (no clouds and no haze) means low humidity.  So no precipitation either.
Not sure how long this guarantee lasts though.  Weather patterns can move at 40 mph.
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aburrCommented:
"does it rule out every aspect of rough or unpleasant weather patters? (no rain/snow/hails/sleet et"
no
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25112Author Commented:
thanks for your input..

aburr, can you clarify what you mean by 'no'
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abbrightCommented:
If there is little humidiy in the air, that is if the water vapor does not condense (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dew_point) then there is no way for rain, snow or hails to develop as all these need condensed water.
Anyway there can be other unpleasent weather conditions like dust storms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_storm), super cold weather, etc. which might experienced as unpleasant.
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abbrightCommented:
See here for other phenomena: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigantic_jet. These are lightnings which sometimes hit the earth very far away from the originating cloud.
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abbrightCommented:
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hdhondtCommented:
A simple rule: you won't get any rain, etc until you can see clouds...

How long that will take is anyone's (or the weather forecaster's) guess. Here's one of my favourite anecdotes:

I live in Sydney, Australia and the usual summer weather used to be clear, hot, sunny days, with a thunderstorm at night. One evening, many years ago I listened to the TV weather forecast. The presenter stood in front of a map of Australia and said "As you can see there is not a single cloud over the entire continent at the moment, and it will stay like that for at least the next 3 days". Believe it or not, 3 hours later it was pouring. The next day was fine again.

Unfortunately we no longer get that kind of weather. This year we had virtually no summer, and dams that were down to 30% are now overflowing. One of the predictions of climate scientists is that, as global warming hits, we will get different and more extreme weather patterns. As far as Sydney is concerned, that seems to have been happening for the past 10 years or so.
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speed_54Commented:
I'd agree with the sentiment that a clear night sky does not preclude a forecast of rain. It depends on the prevailing weather patterns. I have seen instances of clear night skies as you describe, and the next day had rain.
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chrisalisCommented:
From October until the end of May , or even early June, a clear night sky in the northern UK is a reasonable precursor to frost, which I would consider "unpleasant weather" especially when driving in it.

Anyone who was in the UK in December/January of 2010/11 would tell you that after a brief snowfall in late December, we had three weeks of VERY cold (typically down to -16c) weather and CLEAR SKIES EVERY NIGHT. (Yes I KNOW Alaska - that isnt REALLY cold - but it is for us!)

I would also say that the question cold be loaded to say "it depends where you are in the world" - I would expect that in the center of a large land mass (such as the USA) sudden changes of weather are less likely, whereas in a maritime climate, the weather can (and does) change by the minute.

....and NO ONE has mentioned high winds, which can be accompanied by clear skies.
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