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run cacls command from GPO startup script

Posted on 2012-04-06
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Last Modified: 2012-04-11
I have a batch script that runs cacls commands to reset permissions on files in the system32 directory of an Win XP domain computer.   The script is run as a machine startup script from an Active Directory GPO.   The script is not working correctly when run from the GPO.  If I run the script as a domain admin on the computer directly it works correctly.  
1. Can CACLS be run under the local computer SYSTEM credentials correctly?
2. If yes to #1, then what can I do to enable debugging to see why it's not working.

Here's an example of a line in the script.
echo y| cacls %SystemRoot%\system32\at.exe /G Administrators:F System:F
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Question by:AManoux
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by:yo_bee
ID: 37818235
Just out of curiosity doesn't these two accounts have full access?
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by:BelushiLomax
ID: 37818321
Why not just add the permissions using group policy?
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by:AManoux
ID: 37818425
@yo_bee  I'm making permission changes to a multitude of files in the System32 directory.  Some of these permission changes are removing other accounts like "Interactive Users" from the ACE.   But yes, the two accounts I have listed in the example will remain as having full access.

@BlushiLomax  I wasn't aware that I could control the permissions on any file that I want through GPO
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by:yo_bee
ID: 37819095
This is a very bad idea.  I would not change or manipulate any the files or folders in %windir%\ at all.
This can result is adverse results.

I think others will agree with me here.
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by:AManoux
ID: 37819169
For high risk computers like those in public libraries, or any public kiosk, or stre point of sale register, it might be necessary to lock down as many attack points as possible.
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BelushiLomax earned 500 total points
ID: 37819219
Absolutely. Computer - Policies - Windows - Security - File System
Rt click in the right empty pane and add new file or folder and set perms.

I totally agree that giving this folder access is frowned upon and not very secure, but in a locked down environment, sometimes thats the only way to get things working.
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by:yo_bee
ID: 37819222
Are we giving or removing default settings?
That is my concern.
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