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Peer to peer server access trouble

We have a peer-to-peer network server that was just repaired.
The server itself is only used for file storage/ sharing and is set up with a RAID1 array (100% drive mirroring).
A few days ago, the server slowed to the speed of a slow glacier -and would not recover even after running CHKDSK and attempting (but not completing) a defrag.
We took it to a local repair shop that found one of the 500 GB drives was dead.
They replaced the drive, restored the array, ran a defrag and returned it to us.

The problem:
Once rebooted, the server could "see" all the other network computers (6) and access the internet.
However, nobody could access the server. We get the message:  "The file may be read-only or another user may have it open.  Please save the document with a different name or in a different folder."
Tried doing so with the same results.
What are we missing.
When I checked the file sharing permissions, I found that sharing had been turned off.
I restored file sharing - after which all the work stations could "see" the server and the files - and open them -
But - no one can SAVE to the server.
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TimLaL
Asked:
TimLaL
2 Solutions
 
Davis McCarnOwnerCommented:
I think you will find that the repair shop did more than just replace the failed drive (i.e. did a repair install of Windows) or that the permissions got pretty fouled up during the failure period.
The easiest route would be to use Dial-A-Fix ( http://wiki.lunarsoft.net/wiki/Dial-a-fix )
Remove the shares, run Dial-A-Fixes repair permissions (click the hammer icon at the bottom), then redo the shares.  If that doesn't do it, it may be necessary to delete all of the shares and users on the "server", rebuild the permisssions again, then put things back.
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JT92677Commented:
What MFG is the network drive?  They didn't have to do much to fix the RAID, just install a new drive and let the network drive firmware do the rest, which may take time but its nothing you should be billed for.

As to defragging, for what purpose? All they should have done is put in a new drive to replace the one that died.

Also, if you accessed the drive with HTTP (administrator access to the web interface) you would be given info on a failed drive.

Look in that web interface area for a reboot of the network drive, or use the drive's "check" function.

Usually while a drive is in the process of fixing something (like finishing up a mirroring task) it won't be accessible.

As to answer involving a windows install, these external drives don't use windows, they are Samba servers, with custom additions to do whatever the network attached storage guys think is useful to add.

Bottom line: You may find the "solution" right there in the menus for the drive itself if you remember it's IP address or have another way to find it (depending on MFG, they usually have software to take you to the web interface).

Report back on the drive mfg, and how  you did searching through the menu options.

Jeff
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TimLaLAuthor Commented:
I'm awarding equally to both of you.  Thanks for getting back.  
This is one time one of the other folks in our office got it taken care of before I got back.  Saved me some time and heartache.  
Thanks again for all the help.
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