Ping question

When pinging the server by IP or hostname and if its not available, getting reply back from the host I am ping from. 'Reply from 10.1.1.10: Destination host unreachable.'
Is this a normal design?
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Tiras25Asked:
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motnahp00Connect With a Mentor Commented:
A server can be up and still reject a ping.

For my lab environments I will create a GPO to enable ICMPv4 Echo Requests Inbound and Outbound.
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Frosty555Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Yes this is normal. Your network interface sent out the ping, waited for a response, didn't get one, and eventually reported back that it didn't get a response.
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Tiras25Author Commented:
Got it.  Thank you!
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WORKS2011Connect With a Mentor Austin Tech CompanyCommented:
depends, usually the server will respond to a ping especially internally, if it doesn't could mean you have stale DNS records. I would do ipconfig /flush dns on the server and test again, if it resolves to a ping after  you know DNS is holding old records. You need to identify if the server is rejecting or if DNS is not resolving. If DNS related you want to clear this up and resolve before you have further problems.
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tliottaCommented:
It's correct, but not because the ping timed out. The ping was never sent because the ARP request did not return an address.

The example IP address is non-routable, so the network assumption is that the server is on the same network as the device that tried to ping. The ping should therefore go to the MAC address. But if the server is actually down, then no MAC address will satisfy the ARP query. The interpretation is essentially that "there is no route available to that address", hence the phrasing "Destination host unreachable."

It can seem a little odd in the wording, but it is essentially 'as designed'. But no "ping" actually was sent. It all happened by the address resolution protocol (ARP).

Tom
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hirenvmajithiyaConnect With a Mentor Manager (System Administration)Commented:
Yes. Because if both the machines, the host you are pinging from and pinging to, are in the same subnet then you don't require a gateway. This is why the host you are pinging from gives you the reply that the host is not reachable.

Hiren
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ChiefITConnect With a Mentor Commented:
A server can be up and still reject a ping. Typically this comes from a firewall on the server that blocks ICMP echo (ping) requests from anyone who pings the server. This, of course, assumes the client computer and server are on the same subnet and ICMP is permitted on that subnet over the switch.

There are a lot of things that can block ICMP and prevent ping from working.

You are asking this question for a reason:
If you are having problems communicating with the domain server for specific domain functions, first off make sure your firewall is configured for domain features, then ask questions on how to make sure individual services work on Windows Networking.

A host based firewall will block:
File and Print Sharing
Ping (ICMP)
Remote Procedure Call
Netlogon
and other domain features

By default.

Recommend: Google search, (firewall for domain servers) and pull up the Microsoft KB article on how to configure your firewall to work on a domain.
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