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Netmask ordering with different private IP ranges

Posted on 2012-04-06
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Last Modified: 2012-08-14
Hello,

I'm trying to work out an issue I'm running into with deploying Windows Update Services (WSUS) in a multi-site environment.   Specifically I'm having trouble with understanding Windows 2003 netmask ordering feature.   Here are the basics.  

- We have two sites, both of which have a dedicated WSUS server.  
- Each site has an Active Directory controller with DNS installed and setup with round robin and net mask ordering configured.
- DNS is setup with two type A records for the name 'WSUS' which point to the respective WSUS servers.   This is designed to work with round-robin / net mask ordering.  

Site 1
10.2.0.0  - WSUS server lives here
172.20.0.0 - WiFI network

Site2
10.7.0.0 - WSUS server lives here  

The goal is to have all clients in their respective sites contact their local WSUS server for updates.  Also, when these users/laptops move from site to site they need to be able to contact the local WSUS server to get the needed updates.

Everything is working fine when things are on our wired network because the networks use a similar private IP class and the respective sites WSUS servers live within those networks.  The problem is our WiFi network in Site1 uses a different private IP range (172.20.0.0).  When laptops using the WiFI network (Site1) contact DNS,  netmask ordering thinks it is closer to the 10.7.0.0 network which is located in Site2.   So our laptops attempt to go across our WAN in an effort to download and install updates.   Our WAN does not have a ton of bandwidth so this is a problem.  

How can I force laptops using the WiFi network (172.20.0.0) to go to the WSUS server on 10.2.0.0 instead?   I read the following article from Microsoft but I don't think this applies due to the differing IP classes used with our networks.  Of course I'm trying to do this without changing the private IP class of the WiFi network.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/842197

Any advice?  Thanks in advance!
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Question by:rjpaw
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by:arnold
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It is part of the DNS,
so you can define a new zone for WSUS that you will push in the GPO on either end.

mywsus.local zone
site1 - wsus.mywsus.local IN A 10.2.0.x
while on site2 the same zone will have
wsus.mywsus.local IN A 10.7.0.x

If the two are setup in a master/replica configuration the approval/targets will be managed from the central WSUS while providing live backup in the event the current master server dies.
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Anuroopsundd earned 500 total points
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Better way to configure this will be using Sites and services in Active directory.

You can configure a site and services for each subnet. So when the machine come up it gets subnets and updates are send as per the subnet based.

more details in below link

http://www.wiredbox.net/Forum2/Thread6506_WSUS_GPO_Specify_intranet_Microsoft_Update_service_location.aspx
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by:rjpaw
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thanks for the responses.   still trying to think through them.   however, here is an update.  it appears that netmask ordering does not work via my wired subnets either.   DNS is just does the round robin and sometimes I get WSUS IP addresses from the wrong sites.  ugh!
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