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I Have Been Hearing Much About KDE, LMDE, And XFCE In Relation To GNU/Linux. What Are These Acronyms I Believe To Be Precisely? Where Do They Fit In The Grand Scheme Of Things In The GNU/Linux System?

Posted on 2012-04-06
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Last Modified: 2012-04-09
Hello. I am using Linux Ubuntu v.11.10 64-bit operating system.

I have been hearing much about KDE, LMDE, and XFCE in relation to GNU/Linux; more specifically in terms of Debian and Ubuntu? I am trying to understand what 'exactly' these three (and maybe more similar) to these similar acronyms (I think?) are?

I am a newbie to GNU/Linux. As I am learning more about GNU/Linux systems, these acronyms (I believe to be.) I have been learning that these acronyms (Again, I believe.) have been becoming popular in online discussions in the recent year. These acronyms (I believe.) are being raised by proficient Linux users. These same Linux users are encouraging other Linux users to go to them instead of Ubuntu because of 'a better experience' as these same Linux users dislike the new Unity GUI that Ubuntu has incorporated into the Ubuntu programming this past year. These Linux users use these acronym like names with ever sharing what they are in online discussions.  

What 'exactly' are KDE, LMDE, and XFCE precisely? Are they a different graphical environments? Are they a separate project from whatever it relates to in terms of the GNU/Linux systems? Where does KDE, LMDE, and XFCE fall under the grand scheme of things of GNU/Linux? Please explain.

Also, IF it IS a acronym for an formal proper name of another GNU/Linux system, then how many more 'acronyms' exist for other GNU/Linux formal proper names are out there?  Is there an online chart or table with references between the acronym and the proper formal name you can refer me to?    

Please reply.

Thank you!
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Question by:Bazingeroo
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tobyweston earned 500 total points
ID: 37817991
The examples you have given are two different things.

First you have KDE / XFCE. These are GUI environments for the linux distributions. Along with GNOME, they serve as environment that the user sees no matter what distribution they are using. Most distributions prefer a desktop environment, such as Ubuntu usually comes with GNOME as the GUI Desktop Environment, but a version called KUbuntu is available that comes with KDE as default. They are different flavors of what the user uses as the desktop GUI. Unlike Windows which is standard throughout.

LMDE on the other hand is a distribution like Ubuntu or Fedora. It stands for Linux Mint Debian Edition. It is a distribution of the Debian linux environment.

There are many different distributions based on Debian, FreeBSD, Redhat etc all under different names, and each of these usually has the option of the GUI Desktop Environment to use, such as KDE, GNOME or XFCE.

http://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major is a good source of Linux Distributions, including what type of GUI they use.

Also bear in mind that what comes with the distribution is not set in stone. For example, if Ubuntu comes with GNOME, you can still download and install KDE and use that. This will apply to most Linux distributions.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Bazingeroo
ID: 37825728
@ tobyweston:

Hello. Nice to meet you!

Thank you for your comment!

That is a well written comment!!! A layman wihout much Linux experience could easily understand what you said! Thank you!!! You completely covered all aspects of my question/thread in your comment! I have no further questions! I also appreciate the excellent weblink you have included too. Well done!!!

Again, thank you very much!
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