SSD VS SATA HDD

I am ordering toshiba laptop but I have seen that it has 128GB ssd storage and I need to get at least 500GB storage so what is wrong please advice me
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fahad44Asked:
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I am still old school here. I use a 500Gb 7200-rpm hard drive in my Thinkpad and it works splendidly well.

The issue for me is that, while SSD drives are getting better, failures can still be catastrophic. When they fail, hard drives often fail more gently allowing data to be recovered in a pinch.

I know SSD drives are faster, but they still do not have adequate capacity or reliability for me.

... Thinkpads_User
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fahad44Author Commented:
BUT i HAVE read that SSD is faster 100 times than Sata HDD but their problem is storage limit.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I have no practical limitations with a 7200-rpm hard drive, and I want the capacity much more than some additional speed.  .... Thinkpads_User
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rindiCommented:
SSD has no moving parts and that makes them better for laptops, as jolting them etc won't cause the HD to break. Also, they use much less power and that again is an advantage for laptops. Apart from that their speed advantage has been mentioned above.

As mentioned above too, the disadvantages are the price (although they have become cheaper, partly because standard HD's were more expensive and hard to get after the floods in Thailand had caused shortages of standard disks). The data recovery mentioned above shouldn't be an issue, as there should always be good backups and you should never have your data only on one place. But of course it is your responsibility to make backups...

Some notebooks have an extra bay where you could add an additional standard HD, you could use that for extra space if yours has such a bay. Otherwise you can probably order it in another configuration with a larger SSD or standard disk, or get a different model PC.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
It is simple.  Buy a 500GB "laptop" SATA drive to replace the one you have.  The Seagate momentus laptop drive is a good choice as it combines both SSD and a mechanical HDD.  Performance is outstanding as hybrid disks go.   These drives can be found at places like fry's and the large online retailers like newegg.

Also buy an external enclosure so you can put the other drive into.  That way you now have a way to migrate data, and an external enclosure you can use to house the drive for backup.
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Darr247Commented:
Just buy an external 1TB USB 3.0 drive to use with it, since all 10 Portege's (the only Toshibas available with SSD drives) also have USB 3.0 ports.
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fahad44Author Commented:
any advice of toshiba light laptop that has SATA HDD and very light like portege 2830 http://gulf.computers.toshiba-europe.com/innovation/en/series/Portege-Z830-Series/1112901/


please advice any toshiba light and at  minumum weight kg but it must has SATA HDD
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
Just get an R series Portege -- they use traditional rotating platter drives with 500GB capacity:
http://gulf.computers.toshiba-europe.com/innovation/en/series/Portege-R830-series/1103116/

As noted in prior comments, SSD's have 3 significant advantages:  weight;  speed; and reliability ... but two notable disadvantages:  cost and capacity.    Since you need the additional capacity, you simply need to get a traditional rotating platter drive.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
SSDs are NOT 100x faster as a general rule.  It depends on what you are doing.  In a typical laptop, figure 2-3x faster for general use.   Consider that both the SSD and the SATA disk use the same 3Gbit/sec interface.  So to be 100x faster then that would mean your HDD would have to only be able to read/write 30mbits, or real world under 2 MBytes / sec.  A HDD that slow would be unusable.  SSDs are good for IOPS not throughput.
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Darr247Commented:
Hmmm...  re-reading my last post, let me clarify, because I didn't mean to imply that ALL Portege's come with SSD's...
I only meant that all 10 Portege models which come with 128GB SSD also have USB 3.0 ports.

According to http://www.everythingusb.com/speed.html a Seagate 2TB XT in a Thermaltake Max 5G enclosure connected to USB 3.0 achieves faster copy speeds than flash-based SSD's on USB 2.0 (still not as fast on write, though).
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
SSDs are well over 100 times faster in access time than rotating platter drives;  but generally only 2-3 times as fast in their transfer rates.    I agree they're nowhere near "100 times as fast" as traditional drives in net performance.

To give a real world example:   I recently replaced a rotating drive with an SSD for a friend on his laptop.    Boot time went from ~ 75 seconds to 8 seconds.     Program load times went from a couple seconds to effectively instantaneous.    The SSD DOES provide a major difference in the "feel" of the laptop ... but it does this at a significant cost in capacity unless you're willing to spend an appreciable number of dollars to buy a high capacity drive.    [My friend bought a 300GB unit, but it cost ~ $500)

By the way, both traditional rotating platter units and SSDs are "SATA drives" ... SATA is the interface, not the technology of the storage device.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Some of the newer technologies described here sound like a good choice. I have Hard Drive Protection on my Thinkpad, so drives never suffer jolt damage at all. The large hard drive capacity wins for me every time at this point. ... Thinkpads_User
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
IBM/Lenovo has used their "hard drive protection" technology for years -- note this does NOT protect a drive from jolts;  but it DOES minimize the likelihood of damage.    It simply disables active seeking on the drive anytime a G-force above a certain threshold is detected.   Still not as impact-resistant as a no-moving-parts SSD ... but a good feature that helps improve the reliability of traditional rotating platter drives.    Note that Toshiba uses a very similar technology for the same purpose.

For performance and capacity, the hybrid disks suggested by dlethe are an excellent choice -- but would, of course, require swapping out the hard drive after purchasing the unit, since they're not offered as an option for these models.    In addition, the Porteges MAY use the smaller 1.8" drives -- some of the ultra-portables do -- and if so then this isn't an option.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
>>> note this does NOT protect a drive from jolts;  but it DOES minimize the likelihood of damage.

Many years ago, I had a T41 open, working in full flight fall off a table 3 feet to the floor whilst travelling overseas (and nowhere near help). I picked it up and carried on. I have been respectful of that technology ever since. It has never let me down.  ... Thinkpads_User
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
I've had similar experience with a Thinkpad -- a VERY stable platform.    The hard drive protection works very well -- there's a G-Force sensor; and if it detects forces above the threshole it instantly retracts the drive head and disables the drive.    This takes ~ 15ms => about half the time an air bag takes to deploy, so it's VERY quick.

But, of course, not as good as a "drive" that has no moving parts :-)
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Alan HendersonRetired marine engineerCommented:
After 25 years of Windows and DOS, a few months ago I switched to a MacBook Air with a 256GB SSD & 4GB of RAM.

I'm smitten.

I'm so impressed with both the speed and the OS that I've dumped my desktop PC completely. In conjunction with an external Apple monitor and a USB 1TB drive it serves me admirably. Even running Photoshop with no dedicated GPU hasn't caused me any significant performance hit compared to my retired grunty Windows desktop.

The data I'm most likely to use regularly or that I'll need when divorced from my external drive I keep in Dropbox, iCloud, or Evernote so they're continually backed up 10,000 miles from my home. All other data—including Time Machine backups—are on the 1TB external drive and two alternating backup drives

I can't justify the cost of an Apple Thunderbolt external drive and the MacBook has no eSata or USB3, so my external drive is USB2. Even so, there's no going back for me.  The benefits of speed and extended battery life far outweigh the absence of huge internal storage.

Life is sweet.

:)
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fahad44Author Commented:
Thanks all,

I  tried to buy toshiba sattalite r630 serias but I was told that they are out of stock so please   advice  very light laptop that has SATA HDD  not SSD.
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Alan HendersonRetired marine engineerCommented:
@ fahad44

You'd get better advice on your new query if you opened a new question in the appropriate topic areas - PC laptops for instance.

:)
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Alan HendersonRetired marine engineerCommented:
Sorry, I see you already have.

:)
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brandongohwhCommented:
This should solve everything:
Comparison between SSD and HDD -wikipedia
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