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Home office WAN/VPN failover (Cisco ASA) - design

A customer is looking for an improved home teleworker solution beyond the current point-to-point T1 data connections to the main office. The plan is to deploy a secondary connection to each home over broadband cable (over Mediacom/US), and have this higher-speed link provide the primary connection over VPN. If this connection drops, they'd like the existing T1 connection to serve as the backup, and have connectivity immediately fail-over.

The main office is currently being served by a Cisco ASA 5520, and an ASA 5505 can be deployed at each home office to provide for the VPN connection over the cable connection. The existing connection looks like this:

      Main --- T1 router ------WAN------- T1 router ----Home

Adding an ASA to this at the home office would possibly look like the following:

     Main --- T1 router ------ WAN ------T1 router ----ASA ----home PC
          |                                                                      |  
           ---- ASA ------------ Internet ---------------Cable modem

So, the new ASA at the home office would front both the T1 (non-VPN) connection as well as the VPN connection over the new cable connection.  I need to resolve the following questions:

1) Will the above design work?  Can an ASA be configured to send all data over a VPN connection, and then somehow when the VPN drops, start sending data over the unencrypted T1 WAN connection?  (Plus, failing back to the cable connection when it becomes available once more...)

2) If so, looking for some configuration guidance for the ASA on how this would be accomplished.

Thank you - reference links/docs are always appreciated.
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cfan73
Asked:
cfan73
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rscottvanCommented:
Here's an article describing how to configure the WAN failover:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/vpndevc/ps2030/products_configuration_example09186a00806e880b.shtml

I'm thinking you can just create a tunnel on the cable side and route traffic to it, and let traffic drop when you route over the T1, since it's private.  If you need a tunnel on both sides, just build 2 tunnels, and set up the routing to send traffic to the cable tunnel first, then the T1 tunnel if the cable connection drops.

Here's another article with a VPN as well:
http://www.petenetlive.com/KB/Article/0000544.htm
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cfan73Author Commented:
Thanks for the response.

I've seen the first document before, and the current situation differs in that the backup circuit  is not a 2nd Internet service provider, but a direct WAN connection back to the main site. (Thus, it's already there and terminated by a local 1721 router, and wouldn't have to pass through the new 5505 ASA.)  I'm not sure if this changes the design/configuration, but it might...

Would this work?:

- Configure IP SLA across the new (VPN) connection to the outside interface of the head-end ASA, with link tracking.
- Configure a default route on the ASA to this same interface IP.
- Configure static route(s) on the ASA w/ a higher administrative distance (so, floating)
to the remote nets over the T1 WAN connection.

Thanks again
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cfan73Author Commented:
bump for additional input?
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

The question has either no comments or not enough useful information to be called an "answer".
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