Sonicwall MAC Filtering

I want to start MAC filtering at the company I work at with our Sonicwall. But everything I read says that MAC filtering is only done for wireless networks on the Sonicwall. I want to enforce it on our wired network. Does Sonicwall do that?
new_to_networksAsked:
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Robert Sutton JrSenior Network ManagerCommented:
Is there a reason why you would want to filter by MAC? Yes, wireless is the primary use for this type of filtering and is typically not intended for "Physically" connected devices on your network.
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new_to_networksAuthor Commented:
Its to prevent people with unsecure laptops from coming in, plugging into a port and having access to our office network. We want to force them to use our guest wireless. Does that make sense?
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
You might want to do that to discourage users from accessing resources by plugging in "rogue" devices without permission.
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new_to_networksAuthor Commented:
There's a lot of traffic here, so I'm trying to deny unauthorized machines from plugging in to a port.
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
Is it an Active Directory domain?  You could probably do that via Group Policy.  Computer not a member of domain = No access.
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new_to_networksAuthor Commented:
The office is connected to a VPN which goes to our datacenter with our servers/domains etc. If you're away from the office you have to log in to the VPN. If you're in the office, you just plug in and you're already connected. You don't have a user name and password to connect to the servers or anything, but you're on the office network. I'm probably not explaining very well.
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IT-Monkey-DaveCommented:
You could control access by having your DHCP server use "reservations" to issue specific IP addresses to specific MAC addresses.  If someone plugs in a device with a MAC address that doesn't have a reservation, they won't be able to obtain an IP address via DHCP.

Of course a savvy user could assign their system a static IP and bypass DHCP entirely.  Or if everyone already has a static IP, DHCP reservations do you no good.

Sorry but I have to ask: Why no user authentication?
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