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IPv6 and dhcp server

Posted on 2012-04-09
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Can we setup DHCP server on IPv6? Is there any difference from IPV4 ?
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Question by:mokkan
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by:motnahp00
motnahp00 earned 167 total points
ID: 37824825
Yes, you can configure IPv6 scopes with W2K8.

Configuration is wizard driven. You will see everything you need when you go through the setup.
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by:pjam
pjam earned 166 total points
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Be forwarned IP v6 is infinitely more complicated than 4.  If you are set on exploring v6 you might want to consider taking a course, lotss of them being offered.
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by:mokkan
ID: 37824845
thank you.  Any concepts different from IPv4?
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by:motnahp00
motnahp00 earned 167 total points
ID: 37824903
As for technology differences between IPv4 and IPv6, it is huge. Scope configurations is pretty much the same.
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by:pjam
pjam earned 166 total points
ID: 37824926
This is from the wikipedia:
IPv6 in the Domain Name SystemMain article: IPv6 address#IPv6 addresses in the Domain Name System
In the Domain Name System, hostnames are mapped to IPv6 addresses by AAAA resource records, so-called quad-A records. For reverse resolution, the IETF reserved the domain ip6.arpa, where the name space is hierarchically divided by the 1-digit hexadecimal representation of nibble units (4 bits) of the IPv6 address. This scheme is defined in RFC 3596.

[edit] Address formatAn IPv6 address is represented by 8 groups of 16-bit hexadecimal values separated by colons (:). For example:

2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334

The hexadecimal digits are case-insensitive.

An IPv6 address can be abbreviated with the following rules:

1.Omit leading zeroes in a 16-bit value.
2.Replace one group of consecutive zeroes by a double colon.
Below is an example of these rules:

Address fe80 : 0000 : 0000 : 0000 : 0202 : b3ff : fe1e : 8329
After Rule 1 fe80 : 0 : 0 : 0 : 202 : b3ff : fe1e : 8329
After Rule 2 fe80 :      : 202 : b3ff : fe1e : 8329

Below are the text representations of these addresses:

fe80:0000:0000:0000:0202:b3ff:fe1e:8329
fe80:0:0:0:202:b3ff:fe1e:8329
fe80::202:b3ff:fe1e:8329
An IPv6 address may have more than one representation, but RFC 5952 recommends a canonical text representation.

This might be a good place to start getting edumecated:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/ipv6-survival-guide.aspx

Or here:
http://serverfault.com/questions/tagged/ipv6

Just of few things I have looked at to get a head start.
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by:bevhost
bevhost earned 83 total points
ID: 37829590
Actually I disagree with pjam, I think that IPv6 is much simpler that IPv4, it's just that it's not well understood by many folk.

You do not need a DHCP server in a lot of situations with IPv6.  In a network without a router you don't need DHCPv6, machines will just communicate using automatically assign addresses that begin with fe80::
Once you add a router which has a global IPv6 address assigned to it, it can advertise the network prefix to the network, saying, use this prefix and route via me to get to the net.
You can also tell the router to say, look for a DHCP Server instead., you are more likely to do this in larger enterprise networks.
These are called Router Advertisements.

In IPv6 there is no NAT, so everything needs a public IP address.

ISP's often use a feature of DHCPv6 (called Prefix Delegation) to allocate IPv6 Address Blocks to routers to use for their local networks.

See my presentation on IPv6
http://www.bevhost.com/ipv6intro.pdf
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Khandakar Ashfaqur Rahman earned 84 total points
ID: 37831901
Yes, you can.The following link will show you how to configure DHCPv6 on Windows 2008:
http://www.itechtalk.com/thread1818.html
http://4sysops.com/archives/how-to-install-a-dhcp-server-for-ipv6-dhcpv6-on-windows-server-2008-r2/

For basic differences between IPv4 and IPv6:
http://electronicdesign.com/article/embedded/what-is-the-difference-between-ipv4-and-ipv6

However, you need to understand about IPv6 before implementing DHCPv6.There are lots of documents available online on IPv6.
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