Windows 7 virtual screen resolution

I have a netbook and to get a high screen resolution, I used the following:

http://vip.asus.com/forum/view.aspx?board_id=20&model=Eee+PC+1000HE&id=20091227234712546&page=1&SLanguage=en-us

1) Run regedit
2) Search and modify all values "Display1_DownScalingSupported" from "0" to "1"
3) Restart the system
4) Enjoy with the two new resolutions 1024x768 i 1152x864
 
This seems to work well.

I just got a new laptop, and this hack doesn't seem to work.

Any ideas why this would only work on a netbook?

Is there a way via a registry hack or a piece of software to virtually increase my screen resolution on a standard Windows 7 laptop?
leoemgAsked:
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rindiConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I meant the laptop model. Also, are you sure it is intel? I have an Asus Netbook n10jh which has a hybrid Grafical system (Intel and NVidia, it can switch to intel to conserve power), and as long as I only use the NVidia I can get it to display 1024x768 on the 1024x600 screen. But for this to work I had to get a new nvidia driver (it must be one of the newest drivers, I think 2 versions older and that function didn't work yet).
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
That's generally a function of the graphics card/driver as I recall.  It could simply be the graphics card of the new laptop doesn't support it and/or you need to update the driver.
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SandeepSr System AdministratorCommented:
I agree with above comment, you need to check online at the Laptop Vendor's site or if you are aware of the Graphic Card Experts here can advise what will be the Max resolution for this supported Graphic Card, also sometime it is linked with Screen/LCD of Laptop also what level it support. Even if we forcefully put higher resolution and if monitor does not support it, you will see a Black Screen and it will revert back to default settings which worked.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
The registry modification you listed is for Intel graphics drivers.

Your new notebook clearly does not use the same graphics adapter.    If you post the details of the notebook, we may be able to help you find a similar virtual screen extender for that graphics adapter.

OR -- you can use GiMeSpace, which allows you to extend the desktop to virtually unlimited size.
http://gimespace.com/

... the free edition allows unlimited horizontal expansion;  the paid version extends the desktop in any direction.

...
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leoemgAuthor Commented:
Thank you, but GiMeSpace allows scrolling of windows, not scaling of the desktop itself.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
I thought you were after a larger virtual space -- but for physically different custom resolutions the premier utility is PowerStrip:  http://entechtaiwan.com/util/ps.shtm
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leoemgAuthor Commented:
Thank you, but I tried PowerStrip and it doesn't seem to allow scaling, so can't go larger than the 1366x768.

The great thing about the registry hack for Netbook is that is scales the screen.  Which works well if you don't mind things being a bit smaller.

Any ideas on apps that scales the screen?
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LeeTutorretiredCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

The question has either no comments or not enough useful information to be called an "answer".
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Are you sure this isn't a case of the answer being that what was asked cannot be done and that in itself is an answer.

Won't object again if this point isn't considered valid.
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rindiCommented:
It would help to know the model of the laptop. As has been mentioned earlier it depends on the GPU and the driver. For example if the GPU is nvidia it is likely it will work, provided you use a current driver. For that you don't need a registry hack, but you can rather set the higher resolution directly in the nvidia control center.
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leoemgAuthor Commented:
It is Intel built in.
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