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Grep for a particular file in a directory

Posted on 2012-04-10
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Last Modified: 2012-04-10
Hi,

I am finding the text files in a particular directory, which is having any one of the names
['BAH','FOR','OSA','INT','CAB','MIN','IND','NAT','APO'] and then finding teh base name of it.
My problem being I am getting all the text files in the directory, even though their names didn't match the list.

for FF in `ls $SCRIPT_DIR/*.txt | grep -i "['BAH','FOR','OSA','INT','CAB','MIN','IND','NAT','APO']"`
do
F=`basename $FF`
File=`echo $F | sed "s/\..*$//"`
done

echo $File

arquivo.txt
abcd123.txt
BAH123.txt

My shell version is :
bash --version
GNU bash, version 3.2.16(1)-release (powerpc-ibm-aix5.2.0.0)

Please help

Regards..
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Question by:neoarwin
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  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 85

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 37827110
grep -i 'BAH\|FOR\|OSA\|INT\|CAB\|MIN\|IND\|NAT\|APO'
0
 

Author Comment

by:neoarwin
ID: 37827135
@ozo I am still getting file names which are not having matching names in the list.

for example

"arq" is a result I got
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Accepted Solution

by:
woolmilkporc earned 2000 total points
ID: 37827206
Try "grep -E" or "egrep" and omit the backslash escapes:

grep -E -i 'BAH|FOR|OSA|INT|CAB|MIN|IND|NAT|APO'


Instead of the "sed" construct you could do:

File=${F%.*}

Since the extension is always ".txt" you can use "basename" to strip it:

File=$(basename $FF ".txt")

The "sed" stuff is then unnecessary.

(Note that I used $( ) instead of ` ` )


wmp
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Author Closing Comment

by:neoarwin
ID: 37827327
That absolutely worked :)
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LVL 85

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 37827337
for FF in `ls $SCRIPT_DIR/*.txt | grep -i 'BAH\|FOR\|OSA\|INT\|CAB\|MIN\|IND\|NAT\|APO'`
do
F=`basename $FF`
File=`echo $F | sed "s/\..*$//"`
echo $File
done

Unless $SCRIPT_DIR matches BAH|FOR|OSA|INT|CAB|MIN|IND|NAT|APO


shopt -s nullglob extglob
for FF in $SCRIPT_DIR/*{BAH,FOR,OSA,INT,CAB,MIN,IND,NAT,APO}*.txt
do
echo ${FF//@(*[\/]|.*)}
f=${FF##*/}
File=${f%%.*}
echo $File
done
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