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Extended Hard Drive Windows Server 2003 R2

Posted on 2012-04-10
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I have a Dell PowerEdge 2970 running windows server 2003 R2.  I am at the end of space on my initial drive and have inserted an additional HD.  I am wonder if there is a way to allocate the space on the second HD to the data volume on the first HD.  The data on the HD's would just be files no applications, they are both extended partitions, my primary is just running my OS and whatever little application I have running (adobe reader, java, etc).  Thanks for the help!
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Question by:AmSci
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5 Comments
 
LVL 21

Expert Comment

by:motnahp00
ID: 37828466
You can mount a volume with the space from your newly added HD.
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Expert Comment

by:Darius Ghassem
ID: 37828484
The only way is to mount the volume but no direct way to extend the volume since the unallocated space is not directly next to the volume you want to extend
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IT-Monkey-Dave earned 500 total points
ID: 37828488
You can extend the size of the data volume to include the space on the new drive.  Windows Disk Mgr. can do it.  Both volumes have to be Dynamic (not Basic).  Then you can span the original volume across the new 2nd drive and combine the space.  Note that if you're not doing any RAID for fault tolerance, if either of the 2 spanned drives fails you will lose evrything.

EDIT: They have to be contiguous?  I overlooked that part.  I think that's probably correct.

EDIT #2: I was just reading about spanned volumes, don't see any restrictions relating to having to be "next to each other".  If you have a data Drive D: and you add a new drive, you should have no problem extending D: so it spans the original drive and the new drive.  It's been a while since I've done this but I'm pretty sure you can do it.
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Author Closing Comment

by:AmSci
ID: 37828557
Both drives are currently basic by changing them to Dynamic it wouldn't force a re-format or data loss would it?
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:IT-Monkey-Dave
ID: 37828567
No, conversion from Basic to Dynamic is non-destructive.  It does require a reboot but that's all.  Also you can't convert from Dynamic back to Basic (not that you would likely ever need to).
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