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Windows 2003 Server System Time advancing into future on its own

Posted on 2012-04-10
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We have a Windows 2003 domain with 4 domain controllers. We are experiencing an issue I have never seen before on a domain controller. About every four to five weeks, the domain controller system date and time starts advancing into the future on its own. When this event occurs it is always over the weekend and Monday morning the domain controller date and time are literally advancing before my eyes. You bring up the system clock from the system tray and you can seen the clock hands, the months and year advancing into the future. This happens over the weekend and on Monday morning the year is 2064 and climbing. Of course we start having authentication issues because the domain controller is out of synch with the other three domain controllers. No viruses/malware were detected on virus scan. I updated the Windows OS and updated the server firmware. The server receives its time from a network time server that operating normally. Has anyone ever experienced this issue? If so, how did you resolve it.
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Question by:Eric_Lewis
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by:Perarduaadastra
Perarduaadastra earned 500 total points
ID: 37828651
Does anything show in the event viewer when this happens? If so, is it always in association with another system process or event? The problem might be caused by something else that seems to be unrelated, at least at first.

Does the server ever do anything else odd, even if it doesn't seem to affect its operation?

Is it possible for you to whip the lid off the server and check for physical things like swollen capacitors, or perhaps an old staple or paper clip lying on the motherboard? Unlikely, yes, but cheap and quick to check...
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Expert Comment

by:2G33K4U
ID: 37836197
Are you using a Stratum 2 or 3 NTP Source? To be safe lets go ahead set it up to do so. This should be done from your main PDC/DC and all other server should point to the main server for the time.  

w32tm /query /status
if under Source: Local CMOS Clock (then it is not syncing to a real time source.)

Question: are these VM's?

On main DC  
w32tm /config /manualpeerlist:us.pool.ntp.org /reliable:yes
if you restart the time service it will default back to CMOS Clock.

w32tm /query /status
check source again should point to pool.ntp.org

Time Query on PDC
Then restart windows time service on the secondary DC's
check status on one of the secondaries see if things look peachy

Source should show your PDC

Time Query on SDC
Here is a reference to something similar Synchronize Time for Windows Server 2008 Domain Controllers
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2G33K4U earned 0 total points
ID: 37886253
Did this work for you? Curious to know.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Eric_Lewis
ID: 38003553
The issue was a bad CMOS battery on both servers. I swapped out the CMOS battery and the issues has not returned. Thank you allfor your input
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