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PageFile -2008 R2 64Bit

Posted on 2012-04-10
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Last Modified: 2012-04-11
So..My Hard Drive is in dyer need of space, it only has 121mb left. The page File is 9gb and system managed. My server has 6Gb of Memory.

Virtual Memory Settings
I have alot of Data on the E:\ Drive. Whats the best way to change c:\ page file so that it resides on E:\? Does this erase or effect my data on E:\? Do i automatically reclaim the space on the c:\ after this is done? I was thinking of making the c:\ drive set statically at 2048MB and E:\ 9GB static? Thoughts & Solutions please.

Thanks in Advance?
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Question by:earlyriser99
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19 Comments
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:RaithZ
ID: 37829169
You CAN lower the size of the page file, but if the system recommends 9GB I would leave it at that size.  You CAN change the page file to be on the E: drive, it will just take up 9GB more space on the E: Drive.  It will not affect any of the data you have there now.  

I would go ahead and move the page file to the E: Drive.  You will need to reboot for it to take effect.  It will free up the space on C: if moved.
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Expert Comment

by:airborne1128
ID: 37829170
Are these seperate PHYSICAL drives?  Try getting rid of temp files and trash and such first.  The, look at programs that can be removed and re-installed on E:.  Windows LOVES the C:\ for the page file, don't know why, I think it is a throwback to the days of Win 95.
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LVL 59

Expert Comment

by:Darius Ghassem
ID: 37829202
Well I would keep the pagefile that size. You can move the pagefile to another partition which might be a good idea.

You can download this product to help you determine what is taking the space up as well. http://windirstat.info/ From here you can determine if you can move this data to another partition as well
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Author Comment

by:earlyriser99
ID: 37829244
Same physical disk, does this matter.
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LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:Gajendra Rathod
ID: 37829248
In case memory usage of server less than 6GB.

you can simply disable paging file.

Remove the click from "Automatically manage paging  file for all drives"

Now select "No paging file"

This require reboot and paging file will remove automatically.
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Expert Comment

by:airborne1128
ID: 37829252
Yes.  Same disk means there is no real savings in performance.  You can still do it, but the performance gains will not be there.
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Author Comment

by:earlyriser99
ID: 37829286
Gajendra_Rathod...What are the repercussions from not having a pageFile?

 airborne1128....Not really looking at performance gains, just need more space on C:\ drive.
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Author Comment

by:earlyriser99
ID: 37829310
So if i resize the c:\pagefile to static 2500mb and e:\ to 9000mb, this doesnt do anything to the data that is residing on E:\drive does it? Do i get my reclaimed space back on c:\Drive?
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LVL 59

Expert Comment

by:Darius Ghassem
ID: 37829315
You can see a performance hit without a page file
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LVL 6

Assisted Solution

by:airborne1128
airborne1128 earned 250 total points
ID: 37829344
@earlyriser99...that is correct.  However, windows would prefer to have the pagefile on c:\.  It may take some work and monitoring, but I would re-install applications from c:\ to the E:\ and leave the page file.  However, splitting it possible as well...just not preferred.
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:airborne1128
ID: 37829352
You HAVE to have a pagefile.  Without it your machine will not run properly if at all.
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Author Comment

by:earlyriser99
ID: 37829483
By splitting it up....Will i reclaim some of my C:\ HD space?
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LVL 59

Expert Comment

by:Darius Ghassem
ID: 37829493
Yes if you limit the size on C then the system will only use 2GB for example
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:airborne1128
ID: 37829513
Yes.  In fact, you only NEED 250MB on C:\.  That is for the dumpfile.
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LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:Gajendra Rathod
ID: 37829652
Paging file is use to increase RAM capacity.

In case you disable it , there will no issue until server utilization exceed 90% to 100%.


In case RAM utilization is more that 6GB then you should not change this setting.
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Author Comment

by:earlyriser99
ID: 37829660
Thanks  everyone for you input....Im super paranoid so sorry for all the silly questions, one more and i will award point. When i put the 9gb on the E: drive, it should do anything to my data that resides on the E:\drive right?
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:airborne1128
ID: 37829684
Correct.  Your data will be fine.  All the system will do is allocate 9GB for the page file.  I recommend defraging the drive FIRST.
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Expert Comment

by:RaithZ
ID: 37829703
it won't alter your existing data, it will just use up however much space you designate for that page file.. basically it just adds another file to the E:\ Drive.
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LVL 96

Accepted Solution

by:
Lee W, MVP earned 250 total points
ID: 37831211
confirming some posts, debunking others, and providing some missing details (or so I hope):

1.  The only reason to have a pagefile on C: is for memory dumps in the event of a STOP error.  While it's always POSSIBLE you'd need a full memory dump, I cannot recall one single instance in 17 years as an IT Pro that I've needed a full memory dump (in order to have a full memory dump, the Pagefile must be on C: and equal to RAM + 2 MB (I think, if memory serves).  So odds are VERY, VERY good that removing the pagefile from C: will not have an adverse effect, all other things being equal.  (I do leave a small 250-500 MB Pagefile for minidumps, but that's it and frankly, I'm not sure that's even necessary for minidumps.

2. Completely agree - DEFRAG the E: drive before putting a pagefile there.  Better still, consider adding a hard drive you can dedicate to non-critical things like the pagefile, shadow copies, and other data.  This disk need not be RAIDed but likely will need to be the same interface type - SAS if the server uses SAS, SATA if the server uses SATA.  At least if it's on the same controller.

3. You CAN have a system without a pagefile... BUT it's generally not recommended.

For more information on pagefiles, see:
How to determine the appropriate page file size for 64-bit versions of Windows
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/889654

How to determine the appropriate page file size for 64-bit versions of Windows Server 2008 and or Windows 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2021748
(Note: in this article, Microsoft states:
The 64-bit versions of Microsoft Windows Server 2008 and Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 can support more RAM than the 32-bit versions of Windows Server. When lots of memory is added to a computer, a paging file may not be required. When you use the Memory-Pages/sec counter to measure paging file use, the value that is returned may not be accurate. To obtain an accurate measurement of paging file use, you must also use other performance counters. You can use System Monitor measurements to calculate the size of the paging file that your computer requires.

Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 Domain Controllers are not supported without a configured pagefile. Because the algorithm the LSASS database cache depends on the "transition pages repurposed/second" perfmon counter, a pagefile is required to make sure that the database cache is capable to release memory if memory is requested by other services or applications.


Though this article is intended more for Windows 2000/2003, there are several items listed in it that can still apply to 2008 and may help you recover disk space - see:
http://www.lwcomputing.com/tips/static/bootdrivesize.asp
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