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Group header doesn't hide duplicates in Print Preview

Posted on 2012-04-11
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Last Modified: 2012-04-12
I have a relatively simple report, that groups on "Department". The field is set to "Hide Duplicates", which it does in Report View, but NOT in Print Preview . . .

In the attached EE d.b. (and screen print 1), it DOES hide duplicates in Print Preview.

But when I copy the same report into my main system - AS IS - it does NOT hide the duplicates in Print Preview.
- is there some setting I am missing ?

screen print 2 shows Report View - with group header hidden

screen print 3 shows Print Preview - with group header NOT hidden.
field hidden as expected in EE d.b.field hidden in my d.b. in report viewfield not hidden in my d.b. in print previewCandidates-EE.accdb
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Question by:Alaska Cowboy
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by:Jeffrey Coachman
Jeffrey Coachman earned 50 total points
ID: 37833126
Lets keep this simple.

which screenshot that is "Correct"
...and which is "Incorrect"?


This is the issue with using "Report View"...

I never use it, I always use Print Preview...

As I originally stated, you may want to rethink this design,

You seem to be having way too many issue with this "Simple" Report,....
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by:Nick67
Nick67 earned 175 total points
ID: 37833146
I don't use the Report view for anything -- since the point of a report is almost always to print stuff. (And I think it is lying to you)
Now, I also think you aren't clear what Hide Duplicates does

Hide Duplicates will hide controls with identical values within the same report section
See the very simple sample attached.
Open rptIsHidden
Hide Duplicates will hide all the duplicate values within the detail section for ValueA
Now Open rptDoesNotWork
However, when I group by ValueA, so that each ValueA is in its own group header, they all are displayed.

You can achieve the hiding of subsequent values in successive group headers -- but you have to do that through VBA code, and not Hide Duplicates
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by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 37833175
^Correct,

And here again, you want to use "Print Preview", ...as most Format VBA code on reports will only run in Print Preview...
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Accepted Solution

by:
Nick67 earned 175 total points
ID: 37833203
Here is the sample again, with a third report, showing how to use code to get the effect you want.
Open rptUsingCode and have a look

Now, I misspoke in my earlier post.
I grouped, but not by ValueA.  The effect was clear enough, though
Hide duplicates was set to Yes, but didn't have an effect

Report View has some subtle gotchas in it --like not running the code you expect it to.
Neither @boag2000, myself, nor many others have ever quite divined what purpose MS has in creating Report View and why it differed in behaviour from what we expected in Print Preview
IsVisible-v1.mdb
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Assisted Solution

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
Dale Fye (Access MVP) earned 25 total points
ID: 37833258
The only reason I can think of for using report view is to allow allow buttons on the report which will respond to input, I've used this once, to allow drill-down to another report that has more detail on a particular record in the main report, but generally prefer to provide those types of options in my reports form.
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Author Comment

by:Alaska Cowboy
ID: 37833570
aha ! I got it . . . :-)

I had two "group headings" when I only needed a detail section and then do "Hide Duplicates" on the the right fields, now it's working great :-)

Jeff,

having done Sql for a long time and a healthy amount of reporting, I'm good on what I want to do but rough on the edges with implementing this in Access 2010. But from my perspective, I'm off to a good start . . . thank to you all here.

All,
ok on not using Report View, I was just exploring all these items and not knowing what the heck I am doing, but getting straightened out here.

I even solved another problem with this, the "group header" was taking up space when hidden, by "CanGrow", and "CanShrink"
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Author Closing Comment

by:Alaska Cowboy
ID: 37840208
I'm good to go . . . <br /><br />Nick, your sample d.b. was what helped me, simple but then I saw what I needed to do<br /><br />Jeff, you were right . . . too complex . . . in design. What I wanted to do is still logical, imo, but  I was hacking at it in Access. So I simplified this greatly, with a simple report that has a simple sub-report<br /><br />Positions <br />     subreport = candidates<br /><br />it's very simple yet elegant for the user.<br /><br />and my original question (in another post) was to print the OTHER positions the candidate is being considered for, which I might yet do.<br />- so in that case, I might end up with <br /><br />Positions <br />     subreport = candidates<br />        subreport to candidates = OTHER positions that the candidate is being considered for<br /><br />So by simplifying it I got it working great, and should be able to add the 2nd subreport without much difficulty should the need arise.
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