How to get the pid of started background process from Shell script?

Greetings,
In my script I have the following:
#!/bin/sh
expect -f ./connect.exp &
java -Xmx1024m -Xms128m  -cp other.jar

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On my connect.exp
connect.exp
#!/usr/local/bin/expect --  #
spawn ssh root@172.235.255.1 -L 4000:localhost:4000
expect "password:"
#press enter
send "\r";
sleep 300
expect eof

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In my code I have expect doing a establishing a ssh connection and creating a ssh tunneling. Then I leave the process hanging waiting on a loooong sleep.
So I want to kill the process spawned with expect. Therefore I want to get the pid of that process so I can make a kill.

Notice:
I will consider also a correct answer a solution for the silly handling that I am doing on my connect.exp, that would also result in having my tunnelling.

Regards,
r
rjorgeAsked:
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simon3270Commented:
Immeadiately after putting expect into the background (i.. before your "java" line), save the $! value in a variable
  exp_pid=$!

Then you can
  kill $exp_pid
later on.

The slight problem here is that this woudl save the PID of the "expect" command, not odf the ssh it has spawned.  If you kill the expect, the ssh may continue to run.

It looks as though you have a blank password for root - not a secure solution!  It woudl be much better to use private/public keys, then you could have the actual ssh command in your script, so *that* is the one you'd kill.  If you dis that, you woudl add the "sleep 300" to the end of the ssh command line.

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rjorgeAuthor Commented:
Hi,
isn't there a risk that another task is started in the background, from another process, in the interval between I spawn the process running expect and the moment I look at $! ?

Regards,
r
simon3270Commented:
$! is the last background process started by that shell - other processes started by ther shells have no effect.
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