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How to intepret output from gcc fdump-class-hierarchy option

Posted on 2012-04-11
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Last Modified: 2012-04-11
I have a simple class and wanted to study how it is organized into memory.
How can I interpret the following which was produced by using -fdump-class-hierarchy option in gcc.

Basically, I want to know where the vptr will be located in relation to the array for example.

Vtable for A
A::_ZTV1A: 3u entries
0     (int (*)(...))0
4     (int (*)(...))(& _ZTI1A)
8     A::SendCommand

Class A
   size=48 align=4
   base size=48 base align=4
A (0x223a600) 0
    vptr=((& A::_ZTV1A) + 8u)

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class A
{
	public:
		A() { cout << "A's Constructor" << endl; };
		virtual void SendCommand(){};
		void setArray()
		{
			for(int i =0; i < 10; i++ )
			{
				m_array[i] = 'A';
			};
		};
	private:
		int m_a;
		int m_array[MAX_ARRAY];
};

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Question by:ambuli
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Infinity08 earned 500 total points
ID: 37833826
>> How can I interpret the following which was produced by using -fdump-class-hierarchy option in gcc.

Vtable for A                            # first the vtable for the A class is listed
A::_ZTV1A: 3u entries                   # there are 3 entries in the vtable (aka _ZTV1A)
0     (int (*)(...))0                   # the first entry is always 0
4     (int (*)(...))(& _ZTI1A)          # the second entry is always a pointer to the typeinfo (aka _ZTI1A)
8     A::SendCommand                    # next follow entries for each of the virtual functions

Class A                                 # some more specifics about the A class
   size=48 align=4                      # the total size of an object is 48 bytes, with alignment on 4-byte boundaries
   base size=48 base align=4            # same information, but without taking alignment into account
A (0x223a600) 0                         # the pointer to the vtable can be found at offset 0 of an object
    vptr=((& A::_ZTV1A) + 8u)           # the virtual functions in the vtable can be found at offset 8 into the vtable

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>> Basically, I want to know where the vptr will be located in relation to the array for example.

For gcc, the vptr is always in the first word of the object.
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by:ambuli
ID: 37834063
Great! Thank you.
0

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