Hardware, SSD vs RAID

In the current state of technology, which is fater and more dependable.  RAIDs or multi-head SSD's

Are SSD's pushing out RAIDs
Los Angeles1Asked:
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AnuroopsunddCommented:
SSD still are smaller in size. max 250GB and really costly to implement.

SSD is definately much faster even faster then SCSI drive but due to above real implementation is not possible.

we can still have RAID in SSD.. so incase it SSD will come in bigger size and better cost or real critical environment SSD will be put in RAID...
It's all about data in the company and no one will want to have single point of failure even if it is SSD
JT92677Commented:
Ask yourself:  Are SSD's 100% reliable?

If so, fine, but I seriously doubt it.  

RAID serves a different purpose than MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) information on some hardware.

For mission critical data, redundancy is a must.

Why not mix Raid with SSD, if price is not imporant ??

Keep smiling

Jeff
CallandorCommented:
There are Enterprise-class SSDs available, some of which are SSDs mounted as a RAID array on a PCI-e card (http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategory=2021&Tid=11691&name=Enterprise-SSD).  SSDs are not pushing out RAID; they are replacing hard drives.  They have access times of 0.1msec and sustained throughput of over 1000 MB/sec.  Some companies are using them as a cache for much larger data storage.

SSDs have special requirements, namely that if you want to optimize their use, you should implement some kind of wear leveling, since the NAND memory has a limited number of write cycles.  Win7 does this with TRIM; servers do it with a different approach: http://www.storagesearch.com/siliconsys-art1.html
andyalderSaggar maker's framemakerCommented:
For real speed get PCIe NAND flash, e.g www.fusionio.com/platforms/iodrive-octal/ (some other makers doing them now). They're not cheap!
JT92677Commented:
The write cycle limit mentioned by Callandor is one of the reasons I wouldn't jump on the SSD bandwagon.

Also, unless drive read/write is a major bottleneck in a system's performance, it is hard to justify increasing access time if the applications are not read/write intensive, like authoring publications, writing software, working on spreadsheets, doing e-mail, etc., pretty much all the things that typical users do. Fast access on servers might justify fast drives, but network speed may be the more important bottleneck, not drive access speed.

I like to see systems with lots of RAM so any virtual memory is not written to disk, but is in the memory cache, which is faster than SSD anyway.

Jeff

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