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Excel Graph -- Factor Dependencies

Posted on 2012-04-11
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Hello Experts:

I'm doing some basic research on relationships between factors (resources, policy, socio-cultural).

Please find attached XLS with mock data (and thus mock graph/model) -- on "Basic Info" tab.   Also, on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th tab, I've included mock data/survey.

So, given that everything's "mock", please ignore whether or not the presented data makes sense.

Instead, I'd like to determine if a different graph (vs. the basic line graph) could be utilized.   More specifically, depending on >> potential << relationship between the three factors, could there be a "drop-off" scenario (e.g., a curved model).  That is, instead of just plotting the 20 data points sequencially, the graph would take on the shape of maybe a bell curve.  

What do I mean by the last statement?   So, depending on the data set, performance  (either by itself OR based on all three curves combined) might steadily increase until a certain point.  Then, however, it'll drop (following the principles of the "law of diminishing return").  [At this time, I'm not sure how to "combine" the data points across the three factors.  Maybe you have some suggestions.]

Does anyone have a recommendation for achieving such "model" given the provided (sample/mock) data?

I'd welcome any ideas that would illustrate the data differently vs. just using the line graph.

Thanks,
EEH
Initial-Model.xlsx
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Question by:ExpExchHelp
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David L. Hansen earned 500 total points
ID: 37834597
This info may help.
http://www.tushar-mehta.com/publish_train/data_analysis/16.htm

You'll want to use a trendline graph.
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by:ExpExchHelp
ID: 37835202
sl8rz:

At first look, that makes definitely sense.   I'll have to have a closer view at the Sales data example.

W/o haven't had the chance to look at this in detail, the first thing that comes to mind is that the Sales example uses sales volume as the dominant -- if not only -- input.

Disregarding that I have several factors (policy, economics, and performance), each of these use a Lickert scale.   That said, if I were to focus only on economics, how would translate the Sales example into the "Strongly disagree - Disagree - Neutral - Agree - Strongly Agree"?

Any suggestions on tackling the "conversation" from the Sales example to my example?

Thanks,
EEH
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