Hard drive configuration option on a Linux OS

What is best practice for configuring two 500GB hard drives using Linux?  I plan to install an IDS service on the platform and would like to take advantage of both physical drives. Can it be a 1+0 set?

I am not familar with Linux beyond basic caommand sets.

Thank you.
lipotechSys EngAsked:
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SandyConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Yes,  you can go ahead with this and i suggest you to use raid 0 in case you are seeking redundancy.

#mdadm --create /dev/md0 --level=1 --raid-devices=2 /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1 will help you in this required.
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rindiConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The OS is irrelevant here. If you have 2 disks of the same size I'd use RAID 1 with every OS.
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rindiConnect With a Mentor Commented:
No, RAID 0 is the opposite of redundancy. If one disk fails in a RAID 0 array, you loose everything, your OS and data. RAID 0 is only good if you need speed and for temporary data.

RAID 1 (mirroring) is the only 2-disk array that gives you redundancy. If one disk fails and the other is fine, your OS and all your Data will still be fine.

Please note that no form of RAID excuses you from making backups.
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Daniel McAllisterConnect With a Mentor President, IT4SOHO, LLCCommented:
The linix mdraid command set will allow (and help you) create a RAID 10 (which is a combined RAID 1 (mirror) and RAID 0 (stripe) set using just 2 disks (essentially, the disks are each split in half). The resulting performance isn't as nice as a RAID 10 set with 4 drives, but it's better than just the RAID 1 performance.

<from the Linux RAID creation wkik>
RAID10,F2

The Linux MD raid10 has another way to be created - it uses only one mdadm command. For an array of 4 drives use:

# mdadm -C /dev/md0 --chunk=256 -n 4 -l 10 -p f2 /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdc1 /dev/sdd1

Note that this can even be done with only 2 drives (-n 2). For newer drives as of 2008 it is recommended by the people on the linux-raid kernel mailing list to use chunk sizes between 256 kiB and 1 MiB.

To be clear, using 2 drives is trickier... (you'd use pieces with labels like /dev/sda1 /dev/sda2 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdb2), but mdadm is supposed to be able to figure all that out for you...

Of course, with a pair of 500GB drives, using RAID 10 gives you only 500GB of usable space....

Good luck!

Dan
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lipotechSys EngAuthor Commented:
Thanks to all.
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lipotechSys EngAuthor Commented:
Thank you.
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