adding a non-d.b. value to a list view in an Access form

I have a simple form, "Positions" for hiring, it's a simple list of open positions.

I want to have a field that displays "number of candidates being considered", but this isn't working out.

I was able to create a query that shows the count, but when putting this as the recordsource for the form, then I can't create new records.

So the data should look like this

Position              Department              Num of Candidates
Mktg Director          Mktg                                    3
Sales Director         Sales                                     2

What's the approach for this ?

I have a query with the number but not sure how to implement.
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Alaska CowboyAsked:
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Michael VasilevskySolutions ArchitectCommented:
You won't be able to have a form datasheet with a recordsource that uses a calculated field be able to add (or edit) records natively. You'll need to create a pop-up form, for example.
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Alaska CowboyAuthor Commented:
ok, how about when hovering the mouse over the Position Description, a hint tip displays ? If so, I need some help with that, not sure of the syntax.

I would try

dim numCandidates

sql = "select count(*) from position_candidates where position_id = " & Me.PositionId
[run query]
numCandidates = sqlrResult

Me.PositionDescr.HintTip = numCandidates & " candidates for this position
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Alaska CowboyAuthor Commented:
wouldn't the other way of doing be an unbound form ? Just wondering, I wouldn't attempt to do that, just getting started with Access 2010, I was half decent on Access 2000 about 4 years ago but really rusty now, plus using Access 2010 for the first time.
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Michael VasilevskySolutions ArchitectCommented:
Yep you could use an unbound form. That would be the way I would do it, rather than a control tip. Just load the controls on form open and add a save or update button. One nice trick I use is name the controls the same as your table field names then you can use the below code to populate them without having to specify each one individually:

    Dim rst As New ADODB.Recordset
    Dim tblName As String
    Dim x As Integer, y As Integer
    Dim frm As Form
    
    Set frm = Forms!MyForm
    tblName = "tbl_MyTable"

    rst.Open tblName, CurrentProject.Connection, adOpenStatic, adLockPessimistic
    rst.Find rst.Fields(0).Name & "= " & MyRecordID

    x = 1
    Do Until x = rst.Fields.Count
        y = 1
        Do Until y = frm.Controls.Count
            If frm(y).Name = rst.Fields(x).Name Then frm(y) = rst.Fields(x).Value
            y = y + 1
        Loop
        x = x + 1
    Loop
    
    rst.Close
    
    Set rst = Nothing
    

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Alaska CowboyAuthor Commented:
ok, thank you. but I think I'll have to get some more of the basics down and kind of need to go with the hint tip for now, can you help with that.

do you do all your forms unbound ?
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Michael VasilevskySolutions ArchitectCommented:
Yep unbound forms reduce data corruption issues that could result from having a bound form sending data across a network.

Everything you need to know about ToolTips is here: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;119991
Best regards,

MV
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Alaska CowboyAuthor Commented:
MV, ok, thanks. still beyond my skill level and time constraints.

can you help me with this ?

dim numCandidates as Integer

sql = "select count(*) from position_candidates where position_id = " & Me.PositionId
[run query]
numCandidates = sqlrResult

Me.PositionDescr.HintTip = numCandidates & " candidates for this position
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Michael VasilevskySolutions ArchitectCommented:
You need a function to get numCandidates? Try:

Function GetnumCandidates(PositionId As Long) As Double
    Dim rst As New ADODB.Recordset
    Dim strSQL As String
    strSQL = "SELECT COUNT(*) AS NumCandidates FROM position_candidates WHERE position_id = " & PositionId

    rst.Open strSQL, CurrentProject.Connection, adOpenStatic, adLockPessimistic
    rst.MoveFirst
    GetnumCandidates = rst!NumCandidates 

    rst.Close
    Set rst = Nothing
End Function

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Alaska CowboyAuthor Commented:
excellent ! Thank you.
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Alaska CowboyAuthor Commented:
lot of work to do custom tooltips., will have to put on back burner.
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Microsoft Access

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