Accessing a BTree File System using Java

We use an RTISAM database structure, basically a BTree file system.  We access it now using Unix and Fortran, but I'm curious to know if the data can be accessed using Java and if anyone has any idea on where to get information to do this?  I'm not too familiar with how the database keys work, but would love to learn more about that.
cscpaymasterAsked:
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dcesariCommented:
Can you please give more details on how you access this database from Fortran? Do you use language extensions of some proprietary compiler or standard Fortran statements (for filesystem access?!?!), or some API (external library)?
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cscpaymasterAuthor Commented:
Using Procomm Plus command line editor in Unix and standard FORTRAN 77 and 90 commands.  Files are in a directory (two files - one .rec and one .ind) that are accessed remotely.  Calls are made to open and close files on logical file units.  Records are accessed via keys (I assume these are in the index file) and once the right key is located, the associated record's information can be accessed by loading the data into an array.  The data is actually segmented into 'words' and/or bits.  I'm fairly new at this, so I hope this is the info you were looking for.  Because these are files that I can't actually open and look at, I may not be explaining it well.
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dcesariCommented:
From your information I guess these .rec and .ind are Fortran unformatted files, probably .rec is of direct-access type. Anyway there is no(t much) magic in unformatted Fortran files, you simply have to look at the Fortran code and emulate that I/O in java using some kind of binary I/O functions. This is a translate/rewrite-of-code exercise, which reasonably has to be done by hand.

If you attach some examples of OPEN/READ/WRITE Fortran statements used I can say something more.
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cscpaymasterAuthor Commented:
Open a file, array 'DATA' is set to 48 size:
8     CALL OPNEMP(5,'FILENAME',6,ICODE)
      KEY(1)=0
      KEY(2)=0
      KEY(3)=' 1'
      CALL GET$$(5,DATA,KEY,0,ICODE)
      IF (ICODE.NE.0) CALL STOP$('08',2)
...then I can use DATA(1) thru DATA(48) as variable values.  For example, DATA(19) is formated as 15A2, which is 30 alpha characters containing a customer name.  So in my code, I can type CALL MOVE$(DATA(19),CONAME,15)), effectively assigning the value of DATA(19) to the variable CONAME and then use CONAME as I wish to print it to the screen, store it in another array, etc.

The record that I am retreiving is based on the value in KEY, which is an array of length 3 - in this case, the value in KEY(3) of ' 1' brings me to a specific record.

Does this help explain?
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Tomas Helgi JohannssonCommented:
Hi!

http://www.javaforge.com/wiki/66061

Is this something you could use ?

Regards,
     Tomas Helgi
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cscpaymasterAuthor Commented:
Yes, Tomas, thank you.  This is very helpful.
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