• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1299
  • Last Modified:

Dell PowerConnect Fiber Connections

I have to draw out a VLAN map for a bunch of Powerconnect 5448s that are used to connect 3 floors together.  There are two fiber connections from teh top floor to the middle floor and then two fiber connections from the bottom floor to the middle floor.  No VLANs or trunks.  EVerything is one subnet.  1 switch on top floor.  4 switches on middle floor.  1 switch on bottom floor.  The fiber connections only go to one switch on the middle floor.

It looks like the person who configured the switches created link aggregation groups on ports 47 and 48 on the 5448s on the top floor switch (LAG1), ports 47 and 48 on the bottom floor switch (LAG1), and then ports 45 and 46 (LAG1) and 47 and 48 (LAG2) on the middle floor switch that connects the other floors.  Looking at the LAG membership page though on the Powerconnect web UI, there are only 48 ports that are options.  The fiber ports are also labeled 45,46,47, and 48 on the switch itself.

My question is...

When someone creates an LAG for ports 47 and 48 on the 5448 and adds fiber connections to port 47 and 48, do the Ethernet ports 47 and 48 become unusable?  Does the LAG on the two fiber ports now in essence become the 47 and 48 that were previously used by Ethernet?
0
sedberg1
Asked:
sedberg1
  • 2
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
TimotiStDatacenter TechnicianCommented:
I'm not sure if we're talking about the LAG or the combo ports, but:

- If you define a link-aggregation group (LAG) made from 2 or more ports, you basically created 1 new ethernet interface (usually called "port-channel"). From this point on, you configure this interface, not the individual members.

- On the PC5448, the fibre ports are "combo ports". If you install a fibre-optic transceiver (SFP) in the slots, the corresponding UTP (copper) port becomes unavailable, because they share the internal circuits. This provides flexibility (you can use fibre cables), while keeping the costs down (if you don't use fibre, you don't have to pay for 4 working, but unused ports).

Tamas
0
 
sedberg1Author Commented:
Basically that's what I was asking, ignoring the whole LAG question,

When I connected a fiber cable to port 48 on the switch, does it make the RJ45 port 48 disabled?  Actually, what would happen if I had both ports connected?  What if I had the fiber cable in port 48 on the switch and then an Ethernet cable in the RJ45 port 48 at the same time?  Which one would the switch allow communication through?  Is there a priority set?
0
 
TimotiStDatacenter TechnicianCommented:
On most switches, the SFP port has priority.
On the PC 5448, according to the user guide:


If both RJ-45 and SFP are present, and a connector is inserted in the SFP port, the SFP port is active,
unless the copper connector of the Base-T port of the same number is inserted and has a link.
The system can switch from the RJ-45 to the SFP (or vice-versa) without a system reboot or reset.
0
 
sedberg1Author Commented:
Thanks.  That's the info I was looking for.
0

Featured Post

SMB Security Just Got a Layer Stronger

WatchGuard acquires Percipient Networks to extend protection to the DNS layer, further increasing the value of Total Security Suite.  Learn more about what this means for you and how you can improve your security with WatchGuard today!

  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now