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RAID 0

Posted on 2012-04-13
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Last Modified: 2012-04-13
Could someone give me a short description of what RAID zero is
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Question by:Los Angeles1
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by:HomerTNachoCheese
HomerTNachoCheese earned 800 total points
ID: 37844744
Data is striped across your disks - no fault tolerance.
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by:HomerTNachoCheese
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by:jackDOTisenberg
jackDOTisenberg earned 400 total points
ID: 37844752
Raid 0 involves increasing your performance and storage space. It does not, however, provide any redundancy.

Here is a link to some information about RAID: RAID

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

Thanks.
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by:pony10us
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ID: 37844753
Raid 0 is 2 drives where you write (stripe) the information across both with no parity. (No redundancy)
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Anuroopsundd earned 400 total points
ID: 37844757
In Raid 0 data is stripped across multiple disk so you get better performance...

but their is no fault tolerance.. if one disk fail, data is lost..
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by:David
ID: 37844810
Since this is a LINUX forum, my assumption is that you are investigating software-RAID 0, which is utilized via the /dev/md driver.   In this context, it is a way to arrange two or more PARTITIONS (not necessarily hard drives) to improve read or write performance under certain I/O loads.  You could take, for example a single HDD that you are booted to, and then carve out two partitions of 100GB, and create a RAID0 stripe of them using the raid tools or other mechanism.  You would end up with a /dev/md0 array and a file system that mounts the /dev/md0.  

Performance of the filesystem mounted on the md0 array would be able to sustain higher throughput from a single disk drive then if you didn't create a 200GB usable RAID0 array.
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