Installation of Microsoft OS to Mac

rbtalcantara
rbtalcantara used Ask the Experts™
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I bought a Macbook Pro 13 in and I saw one time that my friend using the same Macbook and he was using the Microsoft OS in his Macbook

It is possible to install a Microsoft OS in my Macbook and is safe to install
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Expert of the Year 2018
Commented:
If you want your MAC OS to remain, it is indeed possible to install VMware (Fusion, I think) for MAC on your MAC and then make a Windows (or other) Virtual Machine. It should work just fine.

I use VMware on my Windows 7 machine and have a number of virtual machines.

... Thinkpads_User
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Commented:
There are several ways of doing it.  VMWare Fusion, I Think, allows you to EITHER boot Windows in a VM or boot it directly to the hardware.  VMs won't be as fast as running direct from the hardware, but it's definitely usable.  There's also Parallels for Mac.  And there's BootCamp from apple which allows you to dual boot.  

One important note: YOU have to provide a full RETAIL copy of Windows, NOT an upgrade and not an OEM version.
Commented:
Fusion is an APP that runs under the Mac OS. When you bring it up, it's an APP, it doesn't preclude any other APPs on the Mac from running.

I run Windows XP on my Mac, in Fusion 4 (the latest) and it's compatible with VMware 8 (which I also have on my Windows machines).  If you have an ISO image to install the Windows system, all you do is tell Fusion to use that ISO image, make it connected on startup, and run the Windows Vmware machine. It wil go through an install just fine.

Actually, I just copied the VMware files (the Virtual machine files, vmx, vmdk, etc) from my Windows system to a directory I created on the Mac and clicked on the VMX file after editing the file to remove paths specific to my Windows version. It worked great.

If you run full screen on the MAC, you'd swear you were running ONLY Windows on the Mac, but go to the top, the pulldown appears, and tell Fusion to run in a smaller window.

I was looking at dual booting, but that isn't necessary, furthermore Fusion does a few tricks by creating dummy APPs for Windows data, like WMF. If you click on a WMF on the MAC, Fusion will come to life, run the WIndows VM, and give it access to the WMF file.

The only thing I miss on the Fusion version is CLONING. However, you can move (copy) a machine from the MAC to an external disk, carry it over to a Windows machine, and run it there. I did that recently and it works fine if you understand where to look for the VMware files that have the BIOS, DISK, and VMX settings files.

For $49 Fusion is a bargain in my view. Fusion 4 works best with VMware 7 or 8 for Windows.  I also have Linux running under Fusion 4, it too works great.

Attaching hardware to the Fusion instance of a VMware machine is a snap, and almost seems more polished than doing the same thing on a Windows host machine, but the differences are not much to worry about.

Fusion doesn't let  you boot selectively into Mac OS or Windows, it does better - it allows you to host Virtual machines on the MAC.

The advantage of NOT dual booting is that your Windows OS simply uses disk space on the MAC, it doesn't take over the MAC. To NOT make major changes to the MacBook is an advantage in that to remove the virtual machine, all you have to do is delete the directory holding your VMware files which are either in a directory you might create, or if Fusion does it initially, it will put the files in a package and put one layer of "hiding" on the files, but easy enough to view the package contents and copy to an external drive should you want to run on a Windows Host with VMware for Windows..

Hope this helps.

Jeff

Here's a screenshot of MacOS behind the Windows XP (Fusion automatically adjusts the size of the client machine -- if I go full screen, the Windows machine will look like it's the only thing running).

Fusion 4 running XP on a MacBook Pro while looking at this question.
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byundtMechanical Engineer
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Top Expert 2013
Commented:
Bootcamp, as previously mentioned, is Apple software that allows you to install Microsoft Windows and run software at full speed. It is dual boot; you get to choose whether to run Windows or Mac OSX when you start up. It is free, though you do have to provide your own copy of Windows (a retail version, not upgrade). Apple and Microsoft worked hard together to make sure that customers using Windows in Bootcamp got the best possible experience. I have seen quite a few Microsoft employees using this combination at various meetings in Seattle.

I have used Parallels emulation software for about eight years on my Macs. It works much better than Virtual PC (now owned by Microsoft) and has quite good speed in my opinion (Windows XP and Windows 7) with Office applications (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook). To answer questions on Experts Exchange, I use it with Office 97 through Office 2010.

Depending on the versions being compared, Parallels may have a slight edge over VMWare, especially for games. But it could switch again with the next version.

If you want to run Windows games, you probably will be most satisfied with Bootcamp. Parallels is purportedly OK for older games, but the more demanding the game, the more you will want to run Bootcamp.

No matter which software package you install to let you run Windows, you will also need to install anti-virus software. Windows on a Mac is just as easily infected as Windows on an HP or Dell. The infection won't harm the Mac partition, however.

Commented:
byundt - I have a MacBook pro, from fall, 2010, with dual core intel CPU.

I haven't run parallels, but found a review comparing Fusion 4 to Parallels 7, and overall they are very similar, but Parallels is faster on CPU intensive, and Fusion is faster on other dimensions.  I'll have to look into Parallels, but here's a real difference for me anyway.

I can run virtual hardware, change it, add things to the virtual machine in Fusion, and take that machine over to a Windows host running VMware 7 or 8, and the virtual system is available. This might make the Fusion/VMware system far more portable, since VMware also runs under a Linux host, allow a virtual compuer to be moved among three different platforms -- MacOS, Linux, and Windows.

You are right on the virus issues, and with VMware, the machines default in a way that shares the clipboard (copy from MAC, Paste into Windows for example), so isolation is not by default perfect, although that can be changed.

Does Parallels allow "snapshots" and can the user manage the snapshots to go back to an earlier "version" of the virtual machine?

One last question: If I backup a computer with, say, Norton Ghost, I can take the resulting Ghost files and use the drive images in VMware. I can also create a virtual machine from an existing laptop, for example, and have done this for some old laptops that I didn't need the hardware, but wanted to keep the configuration around since it had some development software on it, and now I can access the old laptop environment by running it up in VMware and using the original compilers, debugging software, etc.  Does parallels have a comparable machine cloning capability?

I'll read more about parallels. Here's a review I found for starters.
http://www.infoworld.com/d/virtualization/mac-virtualization-face-vmware-fusion-4-vs-parallels-desktop-7-173313?page=0,1

Thanks for reading, and if you have comments, I'd appreciate more since you've been using parallels for a considerable amount of time (while I was and remain a VMware user).

Jeff
There's also Virtual Box, which runs on Windows, Mac and Linux machines and lets you run your choice of operating systems. The same Virtual Box guest can be moved from Linux to Mac without changes. It's a little slower than Parallels 7 (I have both on my iMac), but the price is right.
byundtMechanical Engineer
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
Jeff,
Parallels does allow snapshots, and can revert back to one of them. I tried it for a while, but soon exhausted the capacity in a 1 TB hard drive used to store the snapshots and gave it up.

Parallels includes Acronis disk backup and Kaspersky anti-virus software with the retail versions. You used to get a full year, but more recent versions have shorter trial periods. You can renew the subscription to the software either through Parallels or directly with Acronis & Kaspersky.

I've never used Norton Ghost, and cannot comment on how transportable the image is. I will say that Parallels used to assume (and emulate) a certain hardware set (video chip, etc.). This practice may limit the transportability of the image.

Brad
byundtMechanical Engineer
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
Jeff,
Additional information (I had to look it up):

Parallels can clone the virtual machine. There is a wizard for that purpose that can be run when the virtual machine you want to clone is shut down.
http://download.parallels.com/desktop/v7/update2/docs/en/Parallels%20Desktop%20User%27s%20Guide.pdf

You can transfer a virtual machine from one computer to another. This is specifically discussed in the Users's Guide. In addition, Parallels offers emulators that run on both Macs and PCsI imagine that there may be a Windows license issue, however, if you don't use volume licensing where you work.

Parallels Transporter (a free download for Windows, and a feature built into Parallels for Mac) allows you to migrate a computer from a physical machine to a virtual machine. It also enables you to migrate from a Microsoft Virtual PC or VMware virtual machine or virtual disk to a Parallels virtual machine or virtual disk.
http://download.parallels.net/doc/Parallels_Transporter_User_Guide.pdf

Brad

Commented:
Hi Brad,

Okay, good info. I think these virtualizers are reading each others playbooks. Everything you mentioned for parallels is also in VMware, the migrating of physical to virtual, the cloning while not specifically supported in Version 4 of Fusion is supported in all versions of VMware, so I've taken the virtual machine (a collection of files) from a MAC and moved it to a Windows disk drive, opened it without problems, and created a full clone so it's back to being a clean single machine.

Now, one other question: On my Mac, they put a whole slew of APP files that represent things that the Virtual machine can do, whether based on file extensions unique to Windows and not Mac OS, or other things ending with .APP, in a subdirectory of the collection of virtual system files.

When moving to a Windows VM, I just ignored the entire collection of "Apps" and moved the primary files to another external hard disk, and brought it up under Vmware 8 without problems.  Does Parallels have this collection of APPs, so when you double click on, say, a WMF that is not recognized by Apple OS, that it automatically starts Parallels and runs a virtual Windows machine that DOES support the WMF, and passes the file into the virtual machine for access?  I found this to be both cute, and annoying. Maybe Fusion has a switch or setting to stop this automatic creation of an APP for every possible file extension in Windows that isn't supported by Apple OS, but I don't want all those files on my mac, each one just chewing up disk space for no real reason.

Again, thanks for the info. As I noted, I think the competition is so fierce among virtualizing providers that one cannot get very far ahead without the other duplicating features that customers find useful.

Jeff
byundtMechanical Engineer
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
Jeff,
I have 85 MB of applets in my Users...byundt....Applications (Parallels) folder for the Windows applications. I assume this is what you are referring to.

I've always got Parallels on, so I don't know what would happen if I double-clicked a Windows only file on my Mac desktop.

The Start menu is integrated into the Mac dock, so I can launch a Windows app (and Parallels if necessary) from the Mac dock. Parallels has several user interface modes, one of which is to launch the Windows app just like it was a Mac app. Being able to launch apps from the Start menu on the Mac dock is essential in that situation.

Brad

Commented:
Brad,

Thanks again for the info.

I've been reading the pros and cons of each approach, and it seems that devoted Parallels users really like it, and can find problems with Fusion, and VMware users who have been using it for a long time seem to think VMware's products are the best.

Parallels, for example, says it's can import VMware machines, which is a good thing for sure. Then on the VMware website describing Fusion it says

"Upgrade from Parallels: If you have used Parallels Desktop to run Windows on your Mac, VMware Fusion can import your previous Virtual Machines and take them to the next level.

Here's a PDF file describing Fusion"
http://www.vmware.com/pdf/fusion_getting_started_11.pdf

A Parallels overview guide with specifications
http://download.parallels.com/desktop/v7/update3/docs/en/Readme.pdf

The user guid for Parallels
http://download.parallels.com/desktop/v7/update2/docs/en/Parallels%20Desktop%20User's%20Guide.pdf

On these surface and packaging dimensions of each solution, it seems there are pros and cons for each. I would like to know why the CPU time is used more efficiently on Parallels (at least this version) and why the display attributes of VMware is so much faster with their Fusion 4.

Which one to use?  Get the free demo versions and give each one a test drive. Also, find out what is being used by other people you know with Macs that can help you if you run into trouble. If you lived near me, I'd help you with Fusion, if you were a friend of Brad's he could help you with Parallels.

Bottom line: Either Fusion or Parallels will do what you want to do.  

What you don't want to do is setup a dual boot situation, in my opinion, and divide up your hard disk that way. With the virtual machine approach, they generate filespace usage, but don't segment the hard drive or the boot record of the primary host operating system.

Jeff
byundtMechanical Engineer
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
Jeff,
Would you consider revising your suggestion if the ultimate aim is game-playing? No matter how good the emulator, a game that needs high frame rates is going to play better in Bootcamp.

Brad

Commented:
Brad,

If the ultimate aim is Game Playing in Windows, why use a Mac??

I don't use the computer for games but if that's the goal of the one asking the question, I'd suggest getting a separate computer for games. Windows based systems are cheap, and used computers on eBay are even cheaper.

Jeff
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing Engineer
Most Valuable Expert 2014
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Not enough information to confirm an answer.
byundtMechanical Engineer
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
Although the Asker abandoned the question without making any Comments at all (other than the original question), it was definitively answered.

Is it possible to install a Microsoft OS in my Macbook (MacBook Pro 13")?
JT92677:  Yes. I am doing it using Fusion 4 emulation. http:/Q_27675472.html#a37845495
byundt: Yes. I am doing it with Parallels emulation. Bootcamp also works, if you prefer a dual-boot scenario http:/Q_27675472.html#a37845546
rogeroren: Yes. I am doing it with both Parallels 7 and Virtual Box (free). http:/Q_27675472.html#a37846208
John Hurst: I think so, using Fusion to create a virtual machine. http:/Q_27675472.html#a37845410
Lee W. MVP: I believe so, using Parallels or Bootcamp. http:/Q_27675472.html#a37845458

Is it safe to install?
Implicit in the answers from the three people who are actually doing it, "yes, it is safe to install."
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Expert of the Year 2018

Commented:
I agree that answers have been provided.

My own answer http:/#a37845410 is one such answer

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