We help IT Professionals succeed at work.

Is a shut down VM allocated CPU , RAM & disk resource ?

sunhux
sunhux used Ask the Experts™
on
As we have limited Win2008 licence (& CPU & RAM) for VMs
at our DR site to support four production sites, in the event
of failover from 2 production sites (we only commit that at
any one time, 2 production sites will fail), we are setting up
only half the required VMs to support the 4 production sites.

In the event 2 of the production sites fail, we'll then shut
down the other 2 non affected production sites' VMs at the
DR site & then only boots up the additional VMs for the
affected sites' VMs.

When a VM is shut down, is the CPU processor, RAM & disk
resource still allocated to the shutdown VM?

I suppose for a shutdown VM, the Windows licence is treated
as not active, so we won't exceed our Windows volume licence
limit, right?
Comment
Watch Question

Do more with

Expert Office
EXPERT OFFICE® is a registered trademark of EXPERTS EXCHANGE®
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017
Commented:
When a  VM is shutdown, no resources are in use or being used for that VM e.g. CPU or RAM.

Only storage would be used and in use.

Turning OFF VMs will not affect the licenses allocated.
Sorry, I wanted to post my answer on another question. Now i edited my comments.
I believe Microsoft only considers running instances of any Windows OS (physical or VM) alike when it comes to a licensing perspective. You are right, if it ain't running, it ain't considered. You are within Microsoft's EULA.
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Commented:
Microsoft doesn't permit license transfers more than once every 90 days EXCEPT in case of a catastrophic failure where the system is RETIRED and not reloaded.  So being off doesn't necessarily mean you are within license terms.  Further, you are potentially hurting yourself since you are not replicating live data and keeping the systems appropriately patched.

Unless (in terms of licensing) you have SA on the servers - which I believe allows for a cold spare (a system that is periodically turned on for patching and synchronization but is otherwise off most of the time).  

As for licensing, I strongly recommend you keep my disclaimer in mind:
DISCLAIMER: Licensing advice offered here is a "best effort" and based on the understanding of the respondents. Licenses can change and we may not be aware of these changes or may misunderstand them. Further, licenses can differ by country and/or region and what we understand to be true in our region could be false in your region. "they told me on Experts-Exchange" will not be a valid defense in a software audit.  All licensing questions should be confirmed with the appropriate licensing authority (the maker of the software/issuer of the license).

Author

Commented:
Ok, noted on the 90days transfer thingy.

Guess I'll have to accummulate all patches/updates for 90days.

Don't see neil40m's comments.  Where is it posted?
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017

Commented:
that's because he's edited it, I think he was posting on the wrong question.

Author

Commented:
Hmm, looks like the MS url / doc provided by Arunraju
  http://download.microsoft.com/download/F/C/A/FCAB58A9-CCAD-4E0A-A673-88A5EE74E2CC/Windows_Server_2008_Virtual_Tech-VL_Brief-Jan_09.docx
matches some of the information given by leew but with some exclusion:

Assignment of licences:
==================
. For Windows Server software, you can reassign server software licenses from one server to another, but not more often than every 90 days. There are some exceptions to this rule outlined in the Product Use Rights document. For example, you may reassign the license earlier than 90 days if you must retire the licensed server due to permanent hardware failure. Similar rules apply to Windows Server 2008 External Connector (EC) licenses. However, for Windows Server 2008 ECs, under certain conditions, there is a rule for license mobility within a server farm

The exclusion is covered in a PDF brief note found in the url
  http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/briefs/win2008-virtual.aspx
for Licensing Windows Server 2008 for Virtualization technologies.
Extract:
 Storing Instances
If a server is licensed, then stored or non-running instances of Windows Server and
other Microsoft servers do not require separate licenses. The use rights permit you
to store any number of instances under each license. You can also store instances on
a large storage area network (SAN) or store instances on your servers without
needing additional licenses for each instance.


Thus, it looks like arunraju's post in EE id 37848295 stands
Top Expert 2016

Commented:
limited Win2008 licence

WS2008 Web? WS2008 Standard?

Enterprise is a good value since it gives you 1 physical and 4 virtual licenses per server
Data center (way too pricy for most people) 1 physical and unlimited virtual per server.

Author

Commented:
I have a mix of Win Svr 2008 Standard & Enterprise.

So if I have installed one Win2008 Svr Enterprise on a physical
IBM i3850 box, I can still install four more virtual ones on my
ESXi host?
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017
Commented:
So if I have installed one Win2008 Svr Enterprise on a physical
IBM i3850 box, I can still install four more virtual ones on my
ESXi host?

No. That's not how the license works. All those virtual licenses need to be used on the physical server as VMs, not on ESXi.
Top Expert 2016
Commented:
to reiterate what hanccocka stated

Enterprise is a good value since it gives you 1 physical and 4 virtual licenses per server

the server being the computer that you installed the physical copy