How do I mount a UNIX NFS file on my Windows 2003 system?

babyb00mer
babyb00mer used Ask the Experts™
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I have UNIX server named newt on which I'm exporting a directory named /env01/lsf9dev/law/systest/work/ARRIVAL using NFS. What is the procedure or command I need to use to access that file from our Windows server?
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Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2016

Commented:
You need NFS from the Windows Services for UNIX, download: here, description on how to install the NFS client is here (I cannot test this for you btw).

Author

Commented:
According to the Windows administrators, the requisite software is already there. They just don't know how to set up the server as a client so that it can access the directory on the UNIX server. For example, on a UNIX client we simply enter mount node:/directory. The node reference denotes the UNIX server from which the file is being "shared." I don't know what the Windows equivalent is.
Topic Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2016
Commented:
Ok, as said: can't test this but it should be a simple as mounting a share, like this:

mount newt:/env01/lsf9dev/law/systest/work/ARRIVAL <driveletter>:

Description is from this whitepaper.
Alternatively, install/run "samba" on Unix in order to get your Unix box to provide Windows file and print services from Unix.

www.samba.org.

Author

Commented:
Yes. I too am a Samba fan, but this is a production system and I'd have a hard time selling a solution to my management that IBM doesn't support.

The Windows administrator told me that he'll need to reinstall the services which might require a reboot. I know nothing about the Windows side so I'm at his mercy. That's why I'm relying on you guys.

I did show them the mount command suggested by gerwinjansen. As a UNIX administrator, I'm quite familiar with that command. I'm still waiting for a response from our Windows guy. Stay tuned!

Author

Commented:
Please tell me what the effect of the following would be...

mount newt:/env01/lsf9dev/law/systest/work/ARRIVAL *

I don't know why the administrator chose to use an asterisk instead of a drive letter. The system responded with a message similar to the following:

Y: successfully connected to newt:/env01/lsf9dev/law/systest/work/ARRIVAL

However, when we went looking for drive Y, we couldn't find it. When we tried entering "Y:" at the DOS prompt, we got an error stating that something was too small, etc. I'm sorry I don't have the exact message.
Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2016

Commented:
Hi, the start (in Windows) means to map just an available drive letter, apparantly the unix mount command does the same. It would help if you could get the error message otherwise we don't know what is going on or what needs to be changed. Can you post the error message?
Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2016

Commented:

Author

Commented:
Yes, I believe that was the error. Based on the information I found on that site, I have made some modifications to the NFS configuration on the UNIX server. I'm waiting for the Windows administrator to try mounting the directory again.

Author

Commented:
I just wanted to let the experts know that I haven't abandoned this question. I'm still waiting for feedback from our Windows administrator.
Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2016

Commented:
No problem, we're patient :-)

Author

Commented:
I don't think the directorty is being mounted correctly. In the UNIX world, if I mount newt:/env01/lsf9dev/law/systest/work/ARRIVAL as a partition I can access as /mnt (equivalent to a drive letter in Windows), all I can see are the contents of ARRIVAL. I cannot traverse ARRIVAL's path. In fact, /mnt behaves like the root directory - it has no parent. That's how I was hoping the Windows client would behave. From the client's perspective, nothing should exist above the ARRIVAL directory. Part of the problem might be that they're treating it like a folder. They should be treating it like a partition. From the server's perspective it's a folder. From the client's perspective, it's a partition.

Author

Commented:
Eventually we discovered that the security settings on the (Windows) client were too restrictive. Additionally, they reconfigured the client to use UPD instead of TCP.

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