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Sql Server or Oracle Database?

Ricky White
Ricky White used Ask the Experts™
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What are the scenarios in which a Database should preferably be made in Oracle as opposed to Sql Server?
In other words are there any limitations in Sql Server in terms of performance, Functionality, etc that are better addressed in Oracle?
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Top Expert 2011

Commented:
Scalability, from my experience, used to be an issue but that gap started getting addressed from sql server 2005 and now, with sql server 2008, I don't think that gap exists anymore.

Besides, I think that Oracle is unnecessarily too complex.

Finally,  a majority of markets out there use sql server.

I am not an advocate for Microsoft by the way - just my experience having used both.
Top Expert 2012
Commented:
What are the scenarios in which a Database should preferably be made in Oracle as opposed to Sql Server?
This question comes up all the time.  The answer: It depends entirely on the expertise of you and/or your team.  The tool for the most part is irrelevant.
I agree with acperkins...

As an Oracle Resource.. I think oracle has a better tendency in case of robustness or performance and the tools/resources available in market makes it easy to manage.!!
Commented:
Oracle has many features beyond MSSQL but selection criteria should not be this. I personally recommend mssql if it meets your requirement, and you and/or your team has expertise on that, it is simpler in many terms. On the other hand your systems today&future size in terms of datasize and user environment may make it more hassle-free to have oracle due to its robustness-performance-scalability-security and feature sets. If you can specify your needs or plans we may help more
Commented:
This is an open question and will lead to debate.
Having work with MS SQL Server so I may be biased.

I am trying to be objective about the resource needed :
When a company choose Oracle as the database, then the company need a dedicated database administrator.
When it is SQL Server, for a small to medium size database, any skilled IT staff can learn quickly to work on the basic of database maintenance. This happen to all my customers where  they never had a specialized SQL Server dba before, but can run ERP application running on SQL Server.
Most Valuable Expert 2012
Distinguished Expert 2018
Commented:
To add to the opinions:

To stress and reiterate what should be the only issue when making the choice:  Skills of existing staff.

The only other consideration that can make the decision easy:  SQL Server = Windows.  If you have a LOT of good Unix Admins and minimal Windows Admins (more than running setup.exe and calling themselves Admins), Oracle is the easy choice.

Software/Support cost is comparable.  Even features are becoming more and more interchangeable.  When one adds a new feature, the other does in a release or two.

>>any skilled IT staff can learn quickly to work on the basic of database maintenance

Which is why a LOT of SQL Server databases under perform.  Oracle has similar GUIs that allow the untrained to create objects and get stuff up and running.  That does not mean the performance is there.

Show me a SQL Server database without a proper DBA and I'll bet it doesn't perform much better than Access would have.

Author

Commented:
Thank you all! So from what I gather they pretty much serve the same purpose and are pretty competitive. But How about the new Sql Server products like SSIS, SQL Reporting Services, etc Does Oracle have functionalities like those?

Commented:
Oracle has corresponding utilities or product, cost should be calculated carefully
Top Expert 2012

Commented:
But How about the new Sql Server products like SSIS, SQL Reporting Services, etc Does
Oracle have functionalities like those?

Of course, but you are missing the point.  Just for arguments sake, let assume your team has Oracle expertise and you decide that based solely on functinality you are going to go for SQL Server.  Even if Oracle is $20K (this is just a number) more expensive than SQL Server, can you honestly justify that is going to outweigh re-training all your team?  If you do, you are in for a rude awakening.

Author

Commented:
Thanks All!
Its been very helpful!