What are Business Objects?

Ricky White
Ricky White used Ask the Experts™
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What are Business objects in .Net?
Is it related in any way to OOP? or is it something totally different from OOP?
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AndyAinscowFreelance programmer / Consultant

Commented:
A couple of links about more info for design.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model-view-controller
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multitier_architecture

I guess you mean as part of the design of the application.  Yes it is part of OOP (in a way)
What are Business objects in .Net?

       A business object is an object that represents a real-world entity such as a person, place, or business process.

Is it related in any way to OOP? or is it something totally different from OOP?
     Yes, it is related to OOP.

For additional details please visit this link:

http://portal.dfpug.de/dFPUG/Dokumente/Partner/Hentzenwerke/NET%20for%20VFP%20Developers%20Chapter%2008.pdf
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Commented:
You are not referring to "Business Objects" corporation which owned the Crystal Reports (and is not owned by SAP) ?

Author

Commented:
Thanks All. But How is Business object related to OOP? What is the difference between them?

CodeCruiser - I am referring to
http://www.kellermansoftware.com/t-articlebusinessobjects.aspx
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Commented:
Ah ok.

Business Objects & Object Oriented Programming

That looks related doesn't it? In OOP, you created classes and then instances of those classes called objects. You use these objects in a particular way and the approach would be called using business objects. So business objects is a particular use of OOP.
AndyAinscowFreelance programmer / Consultant

Commented:
OOP is Object Orientated Programming.
A Business Object is just one specific component in the whole OOP thing.
An OOP app could have many Business Objects, each for a specific task, (and other objects for other functions).
I think you are making this tougher than it needs to be.

Consider this: let's say you build an object that handles the user's security credentials (yes, .Net has that object already, but bear with me).  Now that is an object that may be absolutely necessary, however, it doesn't really have anything to do with the business purpose of your application.  Now let's say you also build in this application an invoice object (it stores a customer object within it perhaps; it knows when and what was purchased, and the associated charges, etc.).  They are both objects in your application, but only one has what you'd call "business logic" in it.  

It's just that simple.

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Commented:
Now I get it. Thank you all so much!

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