HDMI extenderand stacking network switches

jostick
jostick used Ask the Experts™
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I wish to stack network switches between buildings. Stacking is by HDMI cable. Is it possible to use an HDMI over ethernet extender to do this? We already have cat6 between the buildingsd. Distance is about 80m.

Thanks.
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It looks like you can with a device like this.

http://www.outdoorspeakerdepot.com/caexforhd.html

I only had done that distance with fiber.

CT
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE Fellow)VMware and Virtualization Consultant
Fellow 2018
Expert of the Year 2017

Commented:
Procurve switches can be stacked without using stacking kits and ports, just using standard ports,mand trunking switches together, and configuring stacking members
If you're using Cat5/6, just stick with it.   HDMI cables can carry decent bandwidth, but converting media to/from Cat5/6...it's no longer the same HDMI cable.

Trunk or LAG a few gigabit Ethernet ports to get the width you need.

6Gbps stack cable can be replaced by 3x1Gbps full-duplex ports with Cat6.
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Top Expert 2012

Commented:
Just out of interest: why would you want to stack between buildings?
jostickIT Manager

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Commented:
Units that are next to each other stack at 40Gbps. We have 4 x Cat6 cables between the builings. I'm hoping that even by using them in this manner rather than standard ports I'll get a faster link between the buildings and save some ports. The HDMI baluns that I have looked at use twin cat6 cables. If it gives better than 2Gbps through each cable I'm better off.
jostickIT Manager

Author

Commented:
The only problem that I can thinnk of is that with baluns you have a sender and receiver, so only going one direction. But, the switch has two stacking ports (uplink and downlink) so possibly this would be OK.
Top Expert 2012

Commented:
I'd be cautious with extending the HDMI over Cat6. Already with the HDMI cable you have quite restrictive limitations on what type of cable and what length (I read something like 3m, not knowing what switch you have) you can use. I assume that these limitations apply to the Cat6 as well if you want to run 10Gbps. But anyway, it might be interesting to see if it works your way.
Are those baluns for video?  You have a sender and receiver.  You can't connect equipment for duplex communication.  That is one-way for signal distribution.

I don't know if you can route Tx and Rx traffic over different physical ports or virtual trunks for the same TCP/IP connection.  Or why you'd want to when there's cable capable of full and half-duplex.  Limiting it to simplex cuts the rate in half.  2Gb Tx + 2Gb Rx is 4Gbps over 4xCat6 cables.

4xGbE will give you 8Gbps in full duplex.  And fewer physical connections and converters as points of failure.
I presume that these are Dell PowerConnect switches. Although the form factor is the same as HDMI, they are not carrying the signals that you would expect over a HDMI cable in its usual environment.

Why they used the form factor is completely beyond me, especially as they have to pay a licence fee to use the connector, a fee that they wouldn't have had to pay if they had used a Displayport form factor, maybe they were available cheap from another project...
jostickIT Manager

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