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meleehunt
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Sunfire 4800 power

Just got an old sunfire 4800 in a transfer of equipement.

For testing I want to hook it up to power.

There is no rack with the box, and it appears to have 3 - 3 prong female power inputs, at the bottom left of the server. They look like normal 110v server inputs.  

I want to be sure that these are 110v or 220v ( dont see a switch anywhere)

The inputs are labelled ps0, ps1, and ps2.

Also do all 3 have to be plugged in to power the box or is it some sort of redundant system so I dont have to worry about it for testing.

The server has two cpu boards with a spacer where the third would be.

Thanks for your input.
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meleehunt

8/22/2022 - Mon
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Gerwin Jansen

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Amol

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serialband

Sometimes the label is on the inside panel, especially if there's a large grill on the back end for ventilation.  You have to pull out the power module to see it.  There's usually no problem if you plug the unit into 100-120V circuits.  It generally just won't power it up.  Going the other way can be disastrous.

Most modern PSUs, especially on rack mountable ones can handle 100-240V automatically.  More and more high powered systems are 220-240V only.  Because of that, the 220-240V standard is becoming the preferred voltage on newer rack installations at the data center where some of my systems are housed.  If I want 120V rails, I have to request that.  Although the 240V input at the PSU is the same as the 120V, the 240V power strips don't use a standard 3 prong outlet.  You'll need these hooded extenders to plug into them: http://www.datapro.net/products/pc-power-extension-cord.html?utm_campaign=relprods&utm_source=computer-power-cord-europe&utm_medium=product

I should add that rack mounted systems have very loud system fans.  You don't want to leave that near someones desk.  The noise level's just not worth it, even when they're down to "quiet" levels.
meleehunt

ASKER
Thanks to all that commented, from what I have been able to piece together.

It is 3 * 210~240V connectors that use a pretty common plug at 16 A each.

The redundancy is you must have two plugged in to fire up, but if 3 are used the extra is redundant.

If mounted on the floor rack you have to use the ps0,ps1, and ps2 for power.

If mounted in the designed rack as shown above, you need 2 * 30 A Whips to the rack and then it will disperse the power to the power units via the base power unit built into the rack.

So my best solution unless I run this at home is to find the proper rack and run two whips.

If I run at home get 3 * 20 A breakers at 220V with the proper plugs, and let it act as the home heating system.
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