My PC still thinks its a domain memeber

pma111
pma111 used Ask the Experts™
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What is configured on an XP machine when its joined to a domain. We have a PC (Xp) that is now needed to be completely offline. But now the network cable is pulled it takes up to 30 mins to get to the interactive login. What would need configuring/switching off on the XP machine to speed this up, and what needs configuring/switching off so the machine knows now its only evern local login it doesnt have to go for the domain stuff?
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If you want the machine disjoined from the domain then do this:

sysdm.cpl -> Computer Name tab -> Change -> click Workgroup and restart
Log in to the PC,

Click Start, Control Panel, System
In the Computer Name tab, click Change "to rename this computer or join a domain"

In the new window, make sure in the "Member of" area "Workgroup" is selected.  Enter "workgroup" into the text box

Click OK and follow the prompts to reboot
If your system is not a domain member , then i would check the what are the startups running at msconfig , I will disable the unwanted startups here to speed up the process

Regards,

_Prashant_
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TechnoChatWintel Administrator / Cloud Computing
Commented:
You gave to move the system to workgroup to speedup the logon process.

Author

Commented:
I assume 'running stattup scripts' is trying to be applied from the domain?

Author

Commented:
>.PrashantGirennavar

Are there any likely entries in msconfig linked to the domain/enterprise? Any pointers?
If you make the computer a member of a workgroup then it shouldn't process that policy anymore.
Yes they will contact domain controller .

Start up scripts are stored in domain controller , \\<Server>\sysvol\<domain DNS name>\Policies\<GUID>\machine\scripts Location.
Are there any likely entries in msconfig linked to the domain/enterprise? Any pointers?

 As per my understanding, NO. There will be no startups which are linked to domain/enterprise.

It just that what are all application or startup which are linked to your  computer.

Just go there and remove the unwanted application startup which you dont require

Regards,

_Prashant_

Author

Commented:
I've added it to a workgroup and its still awfully slow takes an age on 'applying computer settings' could there be any legacy domain settings in there that need taking off?
Try using CCleaner to clean up any old files, registry entries and startup items.

Try creating and logging in as a new user, see if that speeds things up.

Defragment the hard disk

Delete the C:\Windows\System32\GroupPolicy folder
Remove the DNS address from your network adapter if they are no longer valid.

Author

Commented:
Motnahp00 - can you detail how to do that?
Make sure you remove unwated start up from msconfig , once done, I would recommend you to login with local account (if it is feasible) and check

Regards,

_Prashant_
BE ADVISED, if you "unjoin" the domain, then the account you've been loggin in as will no longer be the account you're loggin in as, instead you'll be loggin into a different account, a "local" account with it's own desktop, settings, history, email configurations etc.

You may need to "copy" the domain account profile to a local account profile, then unjoin the domain, so that the local account profile has most all of the documents and settings retained.

If you corporate IT department is smart, they're probably preventing you from having priviledges sufficient to unjoin, so you would need credentials with admin priviledges to unjoin.

Alternatively, the box could remain in the domain and the corporate IT could configure the box to allow cached credentials, so even when disconnected you could logon quickly.  That route won't be a good idea if corporate IT has configured accounts to keep their documents and other content across the network on a server and not locally (cached or otherwise)

When companys dispose of machines, sell them off, they'll sometimes be too lazy to unjoin the domain or wipe the drive, rare, but it happens.  Those people would unjoin the domain by logging in as local administrator.  And then it comes back to my first advisory, which is whatever other domain accounts they had been loggin in as, they won't be able to log into anymore, so it's a bit easier to copy those account profiles before instead of after.

Copying profiles?  Control Panel, System Properties, Advanced tab, Settings in the User Profiles section.  domain and local accounts are listed, and "Copy To" is an option.  Catch-22 is you can't copy from or copy to the account you're currently logged in as, and you can't copy to an account that you haven't created yet.  So make the corresponding local accounts you need, then log in as the local machine built-in administrator acount, and copy from the domain account to the local account.

If you can't even get into the local built-in administrator account, which would normally be password secured or policy prevented by corporate IT, you'll need their help with that and/or pogostick utility for that.

Thereafter, if the standalone machine ever needs to connect to domain resources, domain priviledges will have to be provided.  And that will not work properly until after the corporate IT department has made sure the old entry for the machine from when it was part of the domain has been properly removed from the domain server controllers PDC/active directory.

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