Any issues associated with burning an image from an old Western Digital drive to a superior Western Digital drive?

jdana
jdana used Ask the Experts™
on
I have a OptiPlex GX280 Desktop computer that's running just fine, except the hard is periodically making some bad noises. I figured I'd buy a replacement drive, create an Acronis image of the old drive, and burn it to the new drive. I also figured I'd improve the drive in the process:

Old drive: Western Digital WD800JB SATA 80GB 7,200RPM 8MB Buffer
New Drive: Western Digital WD10EALX SATA 1.0TB 7,200RPM 32MB Buffer

Are the disparities in drive type going to problematic with the old drive's image burned to the new drive? I suspect it's not an issue, but I wanted to bounce it off some EE experts before I made the purchase.
Comment
Watch Question

Do more with

Expert Office
EXPERT OFFICE® is a registered trademark of EXPERTS EXCHANGE®
Commented:
Nope. This should be completely fine.
You should be fine. Ghost is another nice tool to create a replica.
I have done it many times with Ghost with no problems.  Only issue may be the dell utility partition.  In ghost you need to choose that the Utility partition stays the same size and the others partition expands to use the free space for its self.
Top Expert 2013

Commented:
be sure to let Acronis expand the 80 GB partition, so you can use the whole disk
but it should work - as said
I'm pretty sure the WD800JB is a PATA IDE drive, not SATA

and THAT is no small difference.

It begs very important questions, such as what is the motherboard inside the computer you intend to pull this swap on?  Does the BIOS support hard disks that large?  If it's an old enough era, and an 80GB drive is around old enough, then the mobo BIOS will have problems supporting drives beyond a few hundred GB in size.  Does the motherboard even have SATA ports?  And do they work?  And are they SATA I, SATA II or SATA III?

I'm going to smugly :o) contradict the experts above and say go back to step one and re-verify model is IDE PATA vs SATA.  

Also within the last few years so-called "Advanced format" drives have been coming out with much larger blocking factors.

If you were using "old" ghost / paragon / Acronis / etc hard drive duplication software that was old enough to be unaware of the new advanced data format, then you probably FIRST have to prep the new HD with the alignment utility.  http://support.wdc.com/product/download.asp?groupid=805
The latest disk copy programs are smart enough to do it automatically, and WesternDigital even provides a complimentary download of True Image "WD" Edition, which will only work by the way copying to WD drives, which is why it's free.  Seagate likewise has a tool and a free copy tool that only works for their disks, or you can buy a recent enough version of a disk copying tool and copy to/from any brand.

You will need to be able to put the machine on the operating table in such a way as to connect both drives to perform the transplant, or else have a bench machine that can do it.
Top Expert 2013
Commented:
ocana  -you're right :  http://tweakers.net/pricewatch/reviews/29476/western-digital-caviar-blue-wd800jb-80gb-pata-100-8mb-7200rpm.html
but in the optiplex xpecs, also sata is referenced, so it"may" be a sata after all..
Drives : from  :  http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/opgx280/en/ug/specs02.htm
 small form-factor: one serial ATA controller supporting one device and one parallel Ultra ATA/100 IDE supporting two devices per channel with one channel

small desktop: one serial ATA controllers supporting one device each and one parallel Ultra ATA/100 IDE supporting two devices per channel with one channel

desktop: two serial ATA controllers supporting one device each and one parallel Ultra ATA/100 IDE supporting two devices per channel with one channel.

small mini-tower: two serial ATA controllers supporting one device each and one parallel Ultra ATA/100 IDE supporting two devices per channel with one channel

mini-Tower: two serial ATA controllers supporting one device each and one parallel Ultra ATA/100 IDE supporting two devices per channel with one channel

as you said, he should open the box, and have  alook; easiest way to tell what it is
noxchoIT Product Manager
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
Will be ok if the new drive does not use 4k sector size or so called Advanced Formatting.
New drives, especially above 500GB, are almost certainly Advanced Format, and, as I endeavoured to explain (per links), you can still copy, but it is better to use the latest copy software, such as the free ones, which will be smart enough to align the copied blocks to the start of 4k blocks, so called re-"alignment", so as to avoid performance penalty if you copy "straight" using older unaware disk duplication software.  

That's how I handled it faced with the same situation a couple years ago when "AF" drives were first appearing.

Similar to the tip, don't resize the special restore partition, I'd even offer another tip and say don't resize the C: os partition to be the entire rest of disk, rather a couple hundred gigs, say 5x it's current size, leave the "rest" of the new hard disk for a D: or E: partition where you can throw additional data and files.

Author

Commented:
ocanada_techguy,

Good catch. Thanks to everyone for the thoughtful responses.

J

Do more with

Expert Office
Submit tech questions to Ask the Experts™ at any time to receive solutions, advice, and new ideas from leading industry professionals.

Start 7-Day Free Trial