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Any issues associated with burning an image from an old Western Digital drive to a superior Western Digital drive?

I have a OptiPlex GX280 Desktop computer that's running just fine, except the hard is periodically making some bad noises. I figured I'd buy a replacement drive, create an Acronis image of the old drive, and burn it to the new drive. I also figured I'd improve the drive in the process:

Old drive: Western Digital WD800JB SATA 80GB 7,200RPM 8MB Buffer
New Drive: Western Digital WD10EALX SATA 1.0TB 7,200RPM 32MB Buffer

Are the disparities in drive type going to problematic with the old drive's image burned to the new drive? I suspect it's not an issue, but I wanted to bounce it off some EE experts before I made the purchase.
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be sure to let Acronis expand the 80 GB partition, so you can use the whole disk
but it should work - as said
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Will be ok if the new drive does not use 4k sector size or so called Advanced Formatting.
New drives, especially above 500GB, are almost certainly Advanced Format, and, as I endeavoured to explain (per links), you can still copy, but it is better to use the latest copy software, such as the free ones, which will be smart enough to align the copied blocks to the start of 4k blocks, so called re-"alignment", so as to avoid performance penalty if you copy "straight" using older unaware disk duplication software.  

That's how I handled it faced with the same situation a couple years ago when "AF" drives were first appearing.

Similar to the tip, don't resize the special restore partition, I'd even offer another tip and say don't resize the C: os partition to be the entire rest of disk, rather a couple hundred gigs, say 5x it's current size, leave the "rest" of the new hard disk for a D: or E: partition where you can throw additional data and files.
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ocanada_techguy,

Good catch. Thanks to everyone for the thoughtful responses.

J