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KTM200
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Network segment routing

Hi all,

This is my scenario:

1 physical network with two subnets, 1st network has IP range 10.5.2.1/22 and second is 192.168.0.1/24. Each segment has its own DHCP server

My gateway is on the 1st segment 10.5.2.1.

I assume i need a router between these networks and this is where my knowledge is limited.

What kind of router is required?
How to i stop the DHCP servers broadcasting on the different networks?
How do i get network 2 to access the internet through my gateway on network 1?
What should my DHCP settings be on network 2 to access my gateway on network 1?

Much appreciated
Windows NetworkingNetworking Protocols

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bbao

8/22/2022 - Mon
David Atkin

What are you trying to accomplish?  Do you just want both networks to be able to access the internet?
bbao

> What kind of router is required?

any router including a Windows computer with IP routing enabled.

the router may have a single LAN interface routing the two subnets on the same physical network. in this case, the router must be able to support multihome: multiple IP addresses on the same physical interface.

> How to i stop the DHCP servers broadcasting on the different networks?

NO way. only one DHCP and one subnet is allowed on the physical network as there is only one broadcast domain.

> How do i get network 2 to access the internet through my gateway on network 1?

through the router, if the router's default gateway is pointed to 10.5.2.1.

> What should my DHCP settings be on network 2 to access my gateway on network 1?

commonly DHCP option 03 is for default gateway. however, as mentioned above, only one DHCP server is allowed on a physical network.

hope it helps,
bbao
KTM200

ASKER
Thank you bbao,

regarding the router and the gateway, i assume one side of the router would have an IP on network 2 and another on network 1.

Would the gateway for network 2 be the IP address of the router (say 192.168.0.1) which then points to 10.5.2.1 on network 1?
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KTM200

ASKER
Hi Scorpeo,

Correct, i need both networks to access the internet and if possible to access my DC on network 1. Can i get network 2 communicating with my DC for user logons by adding the 192.168.0.x range to a second network card on my DC or can this be done at the router in the middle?
bbao

Yes and Yes.
BillBondo

Routers can forward dhcp requests. So only one dhcp server is needed with 2 scopes. Set up a server w/ 3 network cards, 1 for internet and the others for the 2 segments. Ive had to use Routing and remote access with nat enabled for all machines to connect to internet. Maybe more than what you need but its fairly easy and how I have my house setup.
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David Atkin

What router do you have?

I believe you could do it by doing the following:

You would assign one ethernet port on your router to one network (giving it an IP in that network) and another ethernet port on the router to the other (again giving an IP in that network).

Basic Example
Port 1 could be - 192.168.0.1
Port 2 could be - 10.5.2.1
Port 3 (WAN) - Would be connected to the internet and would be the Routers default gateway.

You would set DHCP on each networks to specify the port IP as the default gateway for that network. It wont be transmitted between networks because they are on separate ports.

I am unsure how you would get this to work with the DC on the other network though.


Another idea is to use VLAN's.  Connect one network to port 1 on the router and assign it to VLAN 1.  Connect the other network to port 2 and assign to VLAN2.  Connect the DC to another port on the router and assign it to both VLAN1 and VLAN2.
KTM200

ASKER
Hi Scorpeo,

I dont have a router yet and that is also something i would like to get a suggestion on, is any router capable of doing this or should i be looking at some kind of Cisco device?
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
David Atkin

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bbao

> is any router capable of doing this or should i be looking at some kind of Cisco device?

if it is for a small or test environment, a Windows server or even a Windows XP/7 computer can do that. see below.

How to Enable TCP/IP Forwarding in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315236

for enterprise environment, you may consider getting a good router or a Layer 3 switch. it does not need to be a decent Cisco device, any enterprise router/switch should be capable doing two-subnet routing. :)
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