Unbrick netgear WRG614v5

jillette
jillette used Ask the Experts™
on
Hello, whilst updating my netgear WRG614v5 wireless router, my web browser crashed, and now my router doesn't work. Is there any way of flashing the firmware.  some of the guides i found confused me.

Thanks

Rob
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bbaoIT Consultant

Commented:
Is the router still PINGable over LAN??

try pinging the router's known IP address from a host on the SAME subnet, and checking if TFTP is available on the router.

Author

Commented:
i tried to ping 192.186.1.1 which is the default ip address of the router. It tried using a static ip address as well, but that didnt help.

Static IP set up:

ip: 192.168.1.60
subnet: 225.255.255.0
gateway: 192.168.1.1

DNS: 192/168.1.1
bbaoIT Consultant

Commented:
have you ever changed the default router IP? if so, you should use that IP.

additionally, you may use -t parameter to PING the router continuously, turn off the router and wait for a while, then turn it on again to see if there is any responsible PING results while the router is booting up.
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Author

Commented:
how do i change the router ip?
Well, I can't find any documentation on a WRG614, so I'm going to presume you actually have a WGR614.

They have a recovery procedure on the website

http://support.netgear.com/ci/fattach/get/109/1311011828/redirect/1/filename/Firmware%20Recovery%20for%20Routers%20v1.1.pdf

Do you have the original CD that came with it?

That's required, because the router-specific firmware the recovery program accesses is on the CD, too.
Get the wgr614v5_1_0_9_1_0_6.chk firmware file while you're there, because if you have the CD you'll need it to upgrade to the latest after recovery, and if you don't have the CD you'll need it to 'put' it to the router with tftp if you get it to respond to pings.
If you remember the router's IP, use that to try the pings.

While bricked it may not be possible to reset it. You can try a 30-30-30 Reset, but it's possible the reset button is ignored without a firmware routine to enable it.

Author

Commented:
I tried the 30-30-30 reset but it did not work, also i do not have the original disk.

When i ping the router using the command "ping -t -w 2 192.168.1.1", it it says "Request timed out", i also tried plugging it in and unplugging the router, but i got the same error message. occasionally when i unplug the router i would get the error message "general failure".
Hmmm...
you should be seeing something like

C:\>ping -t 192.168.1.1
Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.60: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.60: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.60: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.60: Destination host unreachable.

Author

Commented:
ping -t 192.168.1.1 this is what happened:

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

C:\Users\rob>ping -t 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

// unplugged the router 
General failure.
General failure.
General failure.
General failure.
General failure.
General failure.
General failure.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 31, Received = 7, Lost = 24 (77% loss),
Control-C
^C
C:\Users\rob>

Open in new window

> // unplugged the router
General failure.
General failure.
General failure.

At that point you should plug it back in and continue watching for a response.

It might respond for only 3 seconds or so, within 20 seconds after you plug it back in, and when you see the first response you would immediately switch to the tftp client (which would already be setup, ready to start sending) and start the 'put'. Then go back to the command window and do Ctrl+C to stop the pings.

But if you can't get it to respond at all like that, you would need to disassemble it and try to find a place to connect a jtag cable, possibly having to solder in a serial port header (if there's even a provision on the router's motherboard for such a header).

You don't recall ever changing the router's LAN address from the default 192.168.1.1, right?

Author

Commented:
i did here an a new log

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]
Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

C:\Users\rob>ping -t 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
//unpluged
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
// plugged in
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
// unpluged and switched port
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
// pluggred back in
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.
Reply from 192.168.1.160: Destination host unreachable.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 85, Received = 38, Lost = 47 (55% loss),
Control-C
^C
C:\Users\rob>

Open in new window


No i never changed the default ip
bbaoIT Consultant

Commented:
after doing a PING against your router, immediately run the following command and let us know the result please.

ARP -A

Author

Commented:
i tried the ARP -a command a few times

C:\Users\rob>ping 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
PING: transmit failed. General failure.
PING: transmit failed. General failure.
PING: transmit failed. General failure.
PING: transmit failed. General failure.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\Users\rob>ping 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\Users\rob>arp -a

Interface: 192.168.1.160 --- 0xa
  Internet Address      Physical Address      Type
  192.168.1.255         ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff     static
  224.0.0.22            01-00-5e-00-00-16     static
  224.0.0.251           01-00-5e-00-00-fb     static
  224.0.0.252           01-00-5e-00-00-fc     static
  224.0.1.60            01-00-5e-00-01-3c     static
  239.255.255.250       01-00-5e-7f-ff-fa     static

C:\Users\rob>ping 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\Users\rob>arp -a

Interface: 192.168.1.160 --- 0xa
  Internet Address      Physical Address      Type
  192.168.1.255         ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff     static
  224.0.0.22            01-00-5e-00-00-16     static
  224.0.0.251           01-00-5e-00-00-fb     static
  224.0.0.252           01-00-5e-00-00-fc     static
  224.0.1.60            01-00-5e-00-01-3c     static
  239.255.255.250       01-00-5e-7f-ff-fa     static

C:\Users\rob>ping 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\Users\rob>ping 192.168.1.1

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

C:\Users\rob>arp -a

Interface: 192.168.1.160 --- 0xa
  Internet Address      Physical Address      Type
  192.168.1.255         ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff     static
  224.0.0.22            01-00-5e-00-00-16     static
  224.0.0.251           01-00-5e-00-00-fb     static
  224.0.0.252           01-00-5e-00-00-fc     static
  224.0.1.60            01-00-5e-00-01-3c     static
  239.255.255.250       01-00-5e-7f-ff-fa     static

C:\Users\rob>

Open in new window

bbaoIT Consultant

Commented:
there is no 192.168.1.1 in your ARP -A, that means the router is not connected at all.

if there is a 192.168.1.1 line there, that means the router is connected but not responding for PING.

Author

Commented:
i have the router connected to the computer. does this mean that the router doesn't assign itself an IP address when it boots?
bbaoIT Consultant

Commented:
i think so, as bricked. :(

i guess Darr247 may share some hints to unbrick the router by short-circuiting a few pins on the motherboard... i did once for my Linksys router.
No; do not short pins.

Here's a procedure for making your own JTAG connection
http://www.myopenrouter.com/article/10341/Recover-Your-WGR614L-Using-a-Serial-Console-Windows/

If you take it apart and your WGR614v5 board looks just like those pictures, that procedure should work.

Here's a source for the cable they say is no longer available from Mouser
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004LBXO2A
I would also get a set of these connectors
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180878451107
and clip off 3 of those pins from one of the connectors, to  insert in the #2, #5 and #6 holes of that cable's plug, then have someone just hold the pins in contact while you follow the putty/tftp directions. Unless you're very proficient at soldering.
Or, you could watch for another WGR614v5 with the CD on ebay, craigslist, et al, and hope the recovery program on the CD could fix it.
I found this on DD-WRT's site for a WGR614v6

Needs 4 x 4.7K resistors,   100 ohm
Pinout Functions for WGR614v6 JTAG
How much does that look like the v5?

These
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=140727605776
should fit that JTAG location in that pic... (you would clip off 6 from the string of 20).

Also, did you ever disable the firewall while trying the ping tests?

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