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I'm looking for Academic Discussion Forums for both free or with payment-registration like experts-exchange but for acadmic topics exactly in computer sceince specially in database.
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Author

Commented:
Hi

I need forums for Academic not Technical
The above forums you write it for technical
Most Valuable Expert 2011
Top Expert 2012

Commented:
also note,  from the terms of use that discussions of answers for academic homework/tests will not be permitted on EE,  nor will other reputable sites likely allow it either.
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Most Valuable Expert 2011
Top Expert 2012

Commented:
you could discuss academic topics in the forums above.  You'll likely get answers that reflect bias toward the platforms of their respective databases but still accurate.

For instance, if you wanted to discuss the internals of index construction, balancing, storage and tree traversal you could get answers from any of the above.

If that's still inadequate, can you be more precise in what sort of topics you're looking for?

Author

Commented:
My friend

Academic questions not meaning howework or something

I only read some acadimic books and I try to implement in my work (I'm not student)
Jim HornSQL Server Data Dude
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Author of the Year 2015

Commented:
Curiosity overwhelms me...  
When discussing databases, what constitutes academic but not technical?

Author

Commented:
When discussing databases, what constitutes academic but not technical?

Yes correct but other experts when I'm ask they think I want to do homework not I want to implement the theories to technical work.
Most Valuable Expert 2011
Top Expert 2012

Commented:
If you're trying to implement something in a database, I would skip academic discussions which may be theoretical and go with the realities of whichever platform you're using.

Author

Commented:
Before I applying the technical part I should understand the theory
Most Valuable Expert 2011
Top Expert 2012
Commented:
maybe not

for instance, going by my example above on indexing.  I used indexes in multiple platforms successfully before ever bothering to study the theory behind B-tree indexing or Oracle's particular implementation.

However, now that I have studied them, that knowledge is interesting but for the most part irrelevant to my job.  For one, the specifics of the implementation of Oracle's index usage aren't fully published.  There are lots of articles and books describing things that people have analyzed from trace files and and datafile block dumps but it's still a gray box at best.  Second, even if I got hold of the source code and documentation for everything related to Oracle's indexes, I don't really have any control over them.  So any theoretical knowledge of how I think the "ought" to work is irrelvant.   For good or ill, they work the way they do and I can't do much about it.  What "is" important for me to learn is how to use the api's that are exposed to me.  

But even if you take the database software out of the question and look at something in your own application design, theory and reality may not coincide.  Take data modelling,  let's say you have a many-to-many relationship between two entities.  That's not directly supported in mainstream databases through foreign key constraints because those constraints are defined for one-to-many.

Another example: most modelling hates NULLs but it's a rare application that won't introduce some nulls to your tables.  I saw in a previous question you asked about 3nf vs bcnf. Interesting stuff, but do your vendor apps come fully normalized?  Do you have any analytic needs where denormalizing would be more helpful?

I don't want to discourage academic growth.  I'm always trying to learn more about everything; and it is good to prepare before jumping into something.  However, databases are not new and all of the major vendors make pretty good products but each with their own set of features and caveats.  So at some point you do have to just start trying stuff and see what works (and works well) within the constraints and opportunities of your system.

Author

Commented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

No answer related to question
Jim HornSQL Server Data Dude
Most Valuable Expert 2013
Author of the Year 2015

Commented:
I object to the delete.  sdstuber's last comment provides excellent prespective to a vague question where the asker has not provided follow-on details as to what is being asked.
Top Expert 2012

Commented:
I agree.  This question should not be deleted.

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