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exchange 2010 issue with information store possible memory leak?

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Last Modified: 2012-06-08
Hi

so there is a serious issue with our exchange store.exe it keeps consuming all of our server resources. I would have to think it was a memory leak of some kind. realize that it has no mem cap and that it is suppose to be a mem huge but our server has 64gb of memory and its using 50 of it. this cant be normal it tends to bring the server it a crawl. we have tried setting caching min and max restrictions on it (Note Never set the min to 10gGb and the max to 30Gb. it makes the databases un-mountable :-(   ). If anyone has the answer or insight to that question as well that would be great. but bottom line store.exe is using 50Gb and needs to be fixed any help is always useful. I feel like I have read every article on Google on this matter.
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Commented:
Agree with other expert. We have one with over 500 mailboxes and we have around 16 GB of RAM and it uses around 13-14 all the time. Thing is that we had about the same usage when I only had around 250 mailboxes on the server.

Still you shouldn't see a drag down of response unless something else is amiss or some other subsystem is underpowered. Exchange 2010 isn't the fastest thing going when you are on the EMC, but for the most part we don't notice and serious issues from a user perspective.

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Commented:
Ya i realize that it doesn't have a cap by design and i have used resource manager to look in to what other processes might be slowing down the system with only the store.exe slowing the system. we did see that our paging files was being eaten up which might have been leading to I/O thrashing. is there a good third party program that might be able to control this beast from taking over my mem and paging files.  useing ADSI caching limiting is out of the question tho since it crashed my servers last time. (((lesson learned))).
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I'm not an IIS guru, so take this with a grain of salt. Early on with Exchange 2010, when I really didn't know much about what I was looking at, we discovered that there were a bunch of processes chewing up large amounts of memory; a bunch of w3wp processes. I tracked these back to IIS application pools. I discovered that I could, with no apparent problems, recycle most of these pools and when I did that a ton a RAM was freed up. You can actually create schedules for recycling in IIS.  But as I said, I'm not an IIS guru and I can't for sure tell you that constantly recycling these is a good idea nor can I say for sure that this would cure your ills, but it might be something work looking into.

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Commented:
I thought of the same thing i noticed that if i were to cycle the service i would gain 70% of my memory back for an hour or so but since the service consumes such a large amount of mem it tends to stop responding when recycling i then have to terminate the process to get it backup and running which en turn brings down exchange and places any emails that might be in outbox during this in to a eternal limbo state
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I've not done it for awhile, but I never had an issue doing the recycle that caused Exchange any issues...still, I don't run as big a machine as you do so recycling would take longer.
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