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Hyper-V and Wyse - Setting up a "proof of concept"

Hi.  
We are looking in to setting up Thin Clients for all our employees.  We have some "high level" questions ...

We've set up a Hyper-V Server 2012 machine on our network.  Using "Hyper-V Manager", we've created some VM's and installed Windows 7 in them -- for example one called "VM-Mark", one called "VM-Dave", etc.  

We were given a free Wyse C10LE thin client device to play with, and we have that device "booted up" and configured (we think).

We know we are missing a "piece" somewhere in the middle:  When the device boots up, what points it the proper VM?  For example, when "Dave" logs in to the device (and I assume our Windows network), what points the device to the proper VM?

I see there is Wyse software called "Wyse Device Manager" -- do we use that to point the device to the Hyper-V server, and associate the login "Dave" to the  Virtual Machine called "W7VM-Dave" ?

We are new at this VM/Hyper-V stuff, and we have not been given much of a budget for the "figuring out" part, so any help you have is greatly appreciated.

Thanks
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Rob Rudloff
Asked:
Rob Rudloff
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6 Solutions
 
PowerComputersCommented:
Any thin client must "point" to a computer name (by dns) or the IP addrress.

In this case each Win7 VM is actually a full independent PC with a name and IP address. Confirm that the Win7 VMs have network connectivity and configure the Wyse to connect to that IP., if not, their network addapters must be configured in HyperV Virtual Network Manager. Basically you choose which physical NICs are available for the VMs. The physical NICs can be dedicated or shared depending on your preference for network load.

Make sure that Remote Desktop is enabled on each Win7 VM and that the user has appropriate rights.

You may also want to investigate Server 2008/2012 Remote Desktop Services
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831527.aspx
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
what do you want to test?

Thin Client eg Remote Desktop Services or VDI?

if you are wanting to test VDI, it needs to Connect to the Connection Broker?

See this video walkthrough for the additional roles that are required

http://www.ditii.com/2009/09/22/windows-server-2008-r2-vdi-server-side-configuration/
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Rob RudloffIT Development SpecialistAuthor Commented:
hancocka:
---  "Thin Client eg Remote Desktop Services or VDI?"  


I don't know if I should do this RDS or VDI.  I'll watch the videos.
What's the advantage of either?    Ideally, a user sits down at any Thin Client here, and "logs in" with their network password, and their personal VM is displayed.

PowerComputers:
Yes, we have the VM's configured, in that each Windows 7 install has a fixed IP.  The physical NIC is shared, and each Windows 7 VM was tested to have network connectivity.
So, If the Thin Client is to point to the VM by the VM's IP address, does that mean that the VM must always be running?  (just like a PC must be running before you can RDP into it)
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
traditional thin client, user gets a desktop session on a server, shared concurrently, with other sessions by other users.

vdi users connect to their personal virtual machine. all virtual machines hosted on the same server.

generally VDI Experience could be better....
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Rob RudloffIT Development SpecialistAuthor Commented:
Yes, VDI it is, then.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
You need to add some more roles. Then the clients connect to the Connection Broker.
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
There is a Wyse Connection Profile Manager (Can't remember the specific name) that you use to set up the Terminal Services/Remote Desktop Services connection to VM-Mark etc.

If you are creating several profiles on the Wyse you can then set up each profile with a TS/RDS client connection to their respective VM.

If your point of testing all of this is to deploy 5 or 10 VMs for specific users then there is no real need for a Connection Broker and VDI/Farm type setup.

If however, you are going to deploy a pool of VMs for 35+ users to connect to then VDI and all of the requisite pieces will be required as mentioned here.

Philip
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Rob RudloffIT Development SpecialistAuthor Commented:
thanks for your info Philip.
By "creating several profiles on the Wyse" what do you mean?  I beleive there are some more "thick" thin client devices from Wyse, but ours has virtually no OS, and has very few settings ... Do some devices allow you to configure several users on the device themselves?

We want as "thin" a client device as possible, and have them configured as generically as possible --

We have 12 users, some of which roam and may work at any desk.  We want them to have the same "experience" as they have now with their own Windows 7 PC's.  The obvious problem with the "roamers" currently is that we have to install their programs and shortcuts on every machine that they may log in to.

We would like to make it as simple as possible, but I haven't read enough about the "TS/RDS" environment versus "VDI" to know which is better for us.

What's the drawback of "TS/RDS" ?   And forgive me, I'm still learning what all the terminology and acronymns mean ...

-- thanks for your help!
-- Rob
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
TS and RDS is the same, new name Remote Desktop Services, replaces the old name Terminal Services.

Here are two documents, which I think will certainly help you as a newbie, in this area.


http://www.pqr.com/images/stories/Downloads/whitepapers/vdi%20smackdown.pdf

This is a independant comparison about VDI, what it is, how it works, etc

Terminal Services from A to Z

 this guide explains everything you need to know about TS. What it is, how it works, how to install it and so on. It goes through all the basics, from installing the server to creating policies to lock it down. A must read for everyone willing to learn more about terminal services. And the best part? Completely free.
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Rob RudloffIT Development SpecialistAuthor Commented:
Thanks.  Still reading documents.  Learning about where and how to implement RDS 2012.  I don't think it will run on our Hyper-V 2012 Core Server -- I think it wants to run on a full GUI version of Windows Server ... maybe ...
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
Hyper-V will be the only role you want running on that host.

You would run the RDS role and apps in a VM guest on that Hyper-V host.

Philip
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