[Okta Webinar] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 713
  • Last Modified:

need help buying a new TV

Hi,

I need to buy a new TV and I need some help with it ... I have a few devices that have HDMI connections... I thought it be easy but there are too many options that I am lost and need some help ... I was looking at Sony and Samsung ... but i need to find something that is good in price as well as options ... i also was looking at smart TVs and needed to know more about that ... for my internet and TV I have Comcast .... i need some help and i am lost ... please direct me please ... Thanks

8-)
0
da_emerson
Asked:
da_emerson
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • +6
5 Solutions
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I got last year's Samsung 40 inch and later got Comcast's HD receiver.  Lot's of HDMI plugs on the side and I think it's got a great picture.  Some of the larger Samsung's with 120HZ refresh rate have slightly better pictures but nothing else did when I got mine.  I saw the 'smart' TVs but didn't want one.
0
 
kreyzieCommented:
I  assume you watch FullHD movie all the time as you have a lot of HDMI cables :D. For FHD , i suggest you must a LED FHD TV with 120hz or above. For me , i prefer 200mhz true motion. I will choose Samsung over Sony because of the LED quality itself. Personally i recommend Samsung Series 7 and above. I own a Samsung 8 Series with built in HD receiver and for internet TV purpose via wireless or lan cable. The display is sharp and there is no motion jerking on 1080p movies.

Happy Shopping!
Cheers!
0
 
Michael-BestCommented:
The competition has forced most TVs to be of similar specs between differnt makers for what you pay for.
It depends mostly on your personal needs...size being the main choice.
Below 40 inch are mostly "HD-Ready" (1366 x 768) &  not "Full HD" (1920×1080)
3D is not for me as it strains my eyes & 40 inch is a practical size.
Some have SD / USB ports if you need to consider that option?
Power consumption ( economy ) may influence your choice?
See TV Buying Guide for more ideas:
http://reviews.cnet.com/tv-buying-guide/
&
http://www.squidoo.com/flatpanel-tv
0
VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

 
Frosty555Commented:
A few "consumer-friendly" specs that you should insist on when buying a new TV. If the TV does NOT have any of these, it should immediately throw up red flags and you should not buy it:

- 1080P high def (NOT 720p)
- HDMI input
- LED or LCD screen (not plasma)
- 178 degree viewing angle (or higher)

Other optional features you may or may not want depending on what you're looking for in a TV:

- 3D capabilities (usually requires the purchase of separate proprietary 3D glasses
- Better quality built in speakers (>5 watts RMS)
- Thin and light profile (either the thickness, or in the amount of border around the screen)
- USB ports and memory card ports
- "Smart" capabilities (incl. network connectivity)

Everything else when it comes to TVs are pretty much completely standardized so long as you stick with the major big brands - LG, Samsung, Sony, Panasonic, Sharp, Philips, Toshiba etc.

Don't concern yourself too much with "marketing fluff" and "technical specs" that are basically irrelevant - e.g. dynamic contrast ratios, "hertz" ratings, or any of the other marketing fluff that TVs advertise (e.g. motionflow technology, live color technology, blah blah blah) etc. These are fuzzy marketing terms that don't have anything to do with anything. The tech specs are so frequently skewed and they refer to such subtle technical aspects of the display that you won't be able to really do anything useful with the information anyways.

You have to SEE the TV in action before you buy it so you can determine if you like the picture quality.

My personal preference as far as vendors go is LG, and Samsung. They both seem to offer very good value-for-money and their features across the board are good.
0
 
Frosty555Commented:
Do you want a "Smart" TV? In my opinion it's not worthwhile.

I like my TV to be a simple display device, and *I* decide what to connect to it.

There are so many third party devices that provide this "smart" functionality far better than the puny little CPU in your television can provide that I don't see the point in paying extra to have it built into the TV.

Apple TV, WD TV Live, Boxee Box, a Playstation 3, any modern laptop or a dedicated desktop PC, heck even many smartphone have HDMI capabilities so you can connect it to your TV. All of these devices provide a rich array of "smart" content that is likely a much nicer experience than whatever your TV will come with.

Besides, no matter how smart your TV is, whatever features it does are going to be clumsy since it requires you to use a television remote to control it, and will likely be obsolete in just a few short years. You probably intend on keeping your TV longer than that.
0
 
gplanaCommented:
I have a 40" Sony Bravia and I'm very happy with it. I think Sony is the number one trademark on TVs, but it's a little more expensive than other trademarks with the same features.

Also Sony TV integrates very well with PlayStation3, which I use as a MediaCenter.

I think FullHD feature is a must nowadays, but I think any Sony Bravia nowadays has this feature (and also Samsung probably).
0
 
CallandorCommented:
Most flatpanel TVs are either LCD, LED, or plasma sets.  Each has its advantages and disadvantages.

LCD
- light weight
- inexpensive
- viewing is not so good off-axis (best view is directly in front)

LED
- same technology as LCD, but lower power usage due to LEDs
- usually more expensive

Plasma
- brighter, richer colors with better blacks
- heavy
- succeptible to burn-in images if left on
- uses more power

The smaller sets below 42" tend to be 720p unless otherwise specified.  I wouldn't go for a smart TV unless you like using a remote for everything or are a heavy streaming video user.  Samsung would be my choice, but Sony Bravia and Sharp Aquos are also very good.  I also picked up a Westinghouse on sale that had a great picture but lousy audio, which I ignored since I was hooking it up to a stereo system.
0
 
gplanaCommented:
I think Plasma is obsolete. I think LED is the future and I will buy this technology: thiner TV and less hot and energy consume.
0
 
mark_harris231Commented:
Plasma is not an obsolete technology, but probably only a good choice for true "videophiles".  As previously suggested, it provides the widest viewing angle and the best representation of color/blacks of any of the techonologies, but with significant tradeoffs - dimensions/weight/power consumption/heat output.  Burn-in was a problem in early generations, but has been resolved for the most part in quality brands (e.g., Samsung, Sony, Panasonic).

Plasma is an excellent choice for a home theater setting where you're seeking to provide the most "true-to-life" experience to the widest viewing arrangement, but would not recommend for daily "casual" viewing.
0
 
CallandorCommented:
>Plasma is an excellent choice for a home theater setting

Exactly, and you can also find some good deals on them - I saw Panasonic Viera 50" sets for $700.
0
 
da_emersonAuthor Commented:
thanks a lot .. i think i know what i am going to get

PLASMA cheaper and better fit for me ... THANKS A LOT

8-)
0
 
gplanaCommented:
I don't agree. I think plasma is obsolete. How many plasma have you seen with fullHD and 3D technology ?

I agree is a cheap option to buy, but I think its lifetime is short, so it can be a bad inversion.

These are my thoughts, but you are the one that have to choose.

Regards.
0
 
Michael-BestCommented:
Sharp 40 inch LCD suits me, but as I commented in ID: 38310537

"It depends mostly on your personal needs...size being the main choice."
0
 
gplanaCommented:
When I bought my 40" TV, first time I seen TV programs I thought it's too huch (I used a 27" TV before), but now I would prefer to buy a 46" or even a 50".

I think size depends on the distance between your sofa and your TV, and also on the price you want to spend.
0
 
PCableGuyCommented:
Plasmas have nice pictures (sort of in the the goldilocks zone in my opinion) but a word of caution - Plasmas are prone to screen glare. For instance, if sunlight comes into a window, it will reflect in a Plasma TV. A lamp in the room will also reflect on a Plasma TV screen. A matte finish is supposed to reduce screen glare, but only you can decide. LCD and LED TVs are not prone to screen glare.

http://carltonbale.com/plasma-vs-lcd-revisited-screen-glare-is-still-the-deciding-factor/

If you're room is dark, screen glare is nothing to be concerned about.

If you buy a smart TV, look at the apps that it provides and decide if that's a toy that you want and also give some thought how you'll connect the TV to your Internet - do you have a Router, is the router wireless or wired only, etc. One advantage of having Smart TV built into the TV is less remote controls, less devices.
0
 
da_emersonAuthor Commented:
thanks a lot ... I have bought a plasma ... THANKS A LOT ... your were really helpful...

Thanks

8-)
0

Featured Post

Important Lessons on Recovering from Petya

In their most recent webinar, Skyport Systems explores ways to isolate and protect critical databases to keep the core of your company safe from harm.

  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • +6
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now