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VMware vCenter Server v5 Licensing

Posted on 2012-08-27
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Hi community.  I'm trying to understand the licensing within vCenter and was hoping someone could explain the attached screenshot.  I know my server is quad-processor but I was under the impression that it was across two physical sockets.  The screenshot says 1 physical socket.  I'm wondering if vCenter is using my other processor or if I'm limited to the one.  

Thanks.
processor.JPG
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Question by:TripapHoniC
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Assisted Solution

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 1500 total points
ID: 38339670
from the information you have provided, you have a 1 CPU (physical socket), Quad Core Processor with Hyperthreading enabled.

How many physical processors are in the Physical Server?

Also check the Summary Screen, Select Host Configuration
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Expert Comment

by:coolsport00
ID: 38339684
Nope...you have a single, quad-core socket. But, you have hyperthreading enabled, which means you basically double your cores to 8 (logically; hyperthreading is a BIOS setting). So, that's where the "8" comes from. So, you should only be using ONE of your vSphere licenses for your host.

Regards.

~coolsport00
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Author Comment

by:TripapHoniC
ID: 38346502
So would my license be preventing the software from using both physical processors?
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Expert Comment

by:xcomiii
ID: 38350304
Well, vCenter is licensed to the server it runs on, it could be physical or a virtual. If you run it  as a VM (which I recommend), you can assign as many cores (not dedicated CPU's) as you want.

Quote from the licensing whitepaper at vmware.com:
VMware vSphere 5 licensing removes all restrictions on physical
cores and physical RAM

If you run it on a physical server, then a standard license is restricted to use only one CPU socket (but all the cores on CPU1, regardless of number of cores).

Does it makes any sense?
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Author Comment

by:TripapHoniC
ID: 38350688
That does make sense xcomiii, however I still do not understand how I would make use of that second physical processor.  It sounds like I'm only utilizing 1 processor and the other one is just sitting there idle.
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LVL 124
ID: 38350795
How many licenses have you purchased from VMware, if you have only purchase 1 CPU, the second CPU is sat their doing nothing!
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Expert Comment

by:xcomiii
ID: 38350949
Maybe you have not enabled CPU2 in the BIOS? I am not sure if VMWare enforces the CPU limit or if it allows you to violate the license terms.

Anyway, it is perfectly fine to run vCenter in a VM, so you can use the physical server for other purposes, for example as another ESXi host.
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Author Comment

by:TripapHoniC
ID: 38366566
I've checked the BIOS and all I can find is enable virtualization, which I already enabled.  Other than that there doesn't seem to be any other place to make sure this extra processor is working.
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Expert Comment

by:xcomiii
ID: 38366747
I know my server is quad-processor but I was under the impression that it was across two physical sockets

I guess that your server is single-cpu with quad core (showing 4 CPU's in Task Manager in Windows). You can verify this by downloading CPU-Z and check your CPU model.
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Author Comment

by:TripapHoniC
ID: 38660315
Hey guys.  Sorry for the long delay but I finally got a screenshot with CPU-Z.  Can you verify that what I'm seeing in my vCenter is actually correct.  1 CPU and 1 processor.  CPU-Z seems to think that's what I have but would that not only read the VM's virtual hardware and not the physical hardware?

Thanks.
cpuz.PNG
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LVL 124
ID: 38660341
does not look right to me, if the processor is a

intel xeon e5620

see here, Intel states 4 cores, 8 threads

http://ark.intel.com/products/47925/Intel-Xeon-Processor-E5620-%2812M-Cache-2_40-GHz-5_86-GTs-Intel-QPI%29

CPU-Z seems wrong?

are you running this in a VM?
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Author Comment

by:TripapHoniC
ID: 38660653
hanccocka I am running it in a VM.  No other way I can run it unfortunately.  Unless I'm missing something.

I too thought this information to be incorrect. It seems as though I'm only utilizing a quarter of my actual processing speed.
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LVL 124
ID: 38661318
Okay, that information is correct, when running in a VM, CPU-Z will see the Host Processor, but it will only see the Cores/vCPUs associated with the VM. Which is based on how many vCPU you have allocated to the VM. e.g. 1.

You would have to run CPU-Z on the host (with no hypervisor)
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Author Comment

by:TripapHoniC
ID: 38668504
You would have to run CPU-Z on the host (with no hypervisor)

How would I run the software on the host without the hypervisor?  It's an ESXi server.
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Accepted Solution

by:
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 1500 total points
ID: 38668630
You would have to boot the server using a Windows bootable cdrom.
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Author Comment

by:TripapHoniC
ID: 38668634
Thanks hanccocka.  I'll try to use a miniPE I keep on hand.  Maybe that will work to give me the full details of the server I'm running vCenter on.
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