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Change Control

Hi,

I have been asked to put a Change Control in place.

This relates to any changes to our server & network infrastructure across our many office sites.

Can anyone point me in the right direction as to learning about Change Control & where I can possibly find some document templates & examples?

Any help would be appreciated.
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craigaddison
Asked:
craigaddison
3 Solutions
 
Joseph DalyCommented:
Attached is the fairly simple change management for we use in our organization. The amount of detail in these requests will depend on how many people in your IT dept and how large your environment is but this should be a good start.

We use a sharepoint document repository to upload these to and have different categories for new, approved, rejected, in progress, complete, etc. This way it is easy for anyone to check the status.
Change-Request-Template.pdf
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mark_harris231Commented:
I would recommend searching "ITIL Change Management" in Google and begin your education there.  ITIL is a highly-evolved and widely-accepted/adopted suite of standards, of which Change Management is one facet.

The following link is a good, first-look:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Change_management_%28ITSM%29
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Fred MarshallCommented:
I will take a different tack than the others who have provided you with useful answers.
A very important question is: "Who has the ability to make changes today?"  If it's only you then fine.  If it's a number of other people then you should be asking yourself: "How are you going to enlist them in the process?"  Can you?  Will it take your boss or someone else to do it?

All the change management paper in the world won't stop changes from happening.  It won't stop changes from happening that go undocumented.  

What happens when there's an emergency where the objective is to get things fixed?  

What role do configuration files and disk images have in this?

There is a hierarchy of needs here:
1) who is doing the changing?
2) do they understand the process and method for *documenting* the changes?
3) do they agree to follow the documentation of changes process?

Then:
1) who can approve changes?  Is there an approval hierarchy set up, defined, published?
2) Is this notion new to the company?  If so, who will promulgate it?
3) Is the notion and the process understood by all who can make changes?
4) do they agree to follow the approval process?
5) what exceptions allow changes without prior approval?

There are probably a few more such things.  I hope you get the idea....  Surely some web search in this regard will help quite a bit.
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Fred MarshallCommented:
What I meant to say was:
You can have a change documentation process *with or without* a change approval process.
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craigaddisonAuthor Commented:
Thank you all very much.

Thank you fmarshall, as you have given me a good few ideas.
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