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Will it work to install a new OEM Windows XP Pro 32-bit on my Dell-laptop than came preinstalled with Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit?

Posted on 2012-09-05
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Will it work to install a new OEM Windows XP Pro 32-bit on my Dell-laptop than came preinstalled with Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit?

I have a completely unused CD-ROM with Windows XP Pro 32-bit, and I need to get started with my laptop as soon as possible. Instead of having to buy a new Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (as I made a mistake and installed Ultimate-version using a clean install with burned ISO, which overwrote the existing factory recovery option F8), would it work to use this CD-ROM, even though the laptop is a 64-bit? If not, what problems could I get?
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Question by:hermesalpha
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LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Lior Karasenti
ID: 38367229
No it won't

You can try install XP home edition and call microsoft for downgrade activation but because
its OEM license i'm not sure that Microsoft will agree.
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Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38367236
If there are Windows XP 32 bit drivers available for your hardware it should work. As it probably is a newer PC you will probably need a floppy disk with the SATA Controller's drivers on it for the installation to succeed (press F6 during the installation process where you can add drivers), or if there is an option within the BIOS to change the controller to run in Compatible or IDE mode, you may have to use that setting. A further option, if you don't have a floppy drive, is to use nliteos with which you can slipstream the driver into a new installation CD (you can also use that tool to integrate SP3 into the CD if it isn't already included):

http://www.nliteos.com/

Something you could also try before installing XP, is just to change the product key for Windows 7 Ultimate to the one your system came with (check the product key sticker on the PC). That should restore it to your home premium version.

Also, most Dell PC's that have their OS pre-installed, come with a recovery partition. If that partition is still there you can try doing the recovery from that partition and you should have your system back in the state came in when you bought it. Check the manual for details on how to use the recovery option. On Dells you normally have to press F11 or ctrl+F11 when you boot during the blue Dell Splash screen.

Something else to note is that 32 bit versions of Windows can only address up to 4GB of RAM, and since some of that address space is used by other hardware, you only have about 3GB that will actually be usable. So if you have 4GB of RAM or more, you won't be able to use all of it with XP.
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by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38367293
Some further things I didn't yet mention but which can be important:

1. If you are going to install your OEM XP onto this PC, be aware that you will only be able to use on that PC once it is activated. If you intend to go back to Windows 7 later it'll have been a waste of the License, unless you do a dual boot.

2. Provided the installed Windows 7 ultimate is a legit iso, you can use it without activation for up to 90 Days.

3. As Windows 7 uses the same base for all versions between the starter and the ultimate version (only enterprise is different), you could extract the files from the iso, then delete the ei.cfg file from the extracted files, and create a new iso or copy to a USB stick using rt7lite. After that when you boot from the installation DVD or USB stick you'll have all those versions available to install, including Windows 7 home premium. You can then just use your Dell Product key to activate it. In my opinion that would be the best option, much better than installing XP:

http://www.rt7lite.com/
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LVL 63

Assisted Solution

by:☠ MASQ ☠
☠ MASQ ☠ earned 320 total points
ID: 38367513
It will work if it's a Dell OEM CD but it won't be legal or licensed because Windows 7 Home Premium does not entitle the user to downgrade rights to an earlier operating system:

http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/downgrade_rights.aspx#fbid=v28W_A07f9D

"OEM Versions of Windows 7 Eligible for DowngradeOnly certain OEM versions of Windows 7 include downgrade rights:

Windows 7 Professional and Windows 7 Ultimate include downgrade rights to Windows Vista Business and Windows Vista Ultimate.
Windows 7 Professional and Windows 7 Ultimate include downgrade rights to Windows XP Professional, Windows XP Tablet PC Edition, or Windows XP x64 Edition.
Other OEM Windows 7 versions (for instance, Windows 7 Home Basic and Windows 7 Home Premium) do not include downgrade rights."


You can only legally downgrade a Windows 7 machine with a Pro or Ultimate CoA sticker.

If you've installed a legitimate retail copy of Ultimate then you can't downgrade that as only pre-installed versions of W7 are eligible for downgrading.
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LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38367554
If it is a new, retail bought XP OEM CD (not a Dell or other branded version), then there is no problem installing it instead of Windows 7, as then you aren't using a Dell Downgrade, but rather a bought XP OEM CD.
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LVL 63

Assisted Solution

by:☠ MASQ ☠
☠ MASQ ☠ earned 320 total points
ID: 38367822
Sorry rindi, that is just wrong.  An OEM "System Builder" disc can only be installed on a new PC and can't be used by the person who installed it as System Builder installs must be supplied to someone who is not the system builder.  It would work but the licence won't be valid & would be no different to using the Dell OEM CD they've already got.  The Dell disc is actually a more legitimate solution than the System Builder if the Asker had a qualifying version of Windows 7.
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by:Jim-R
Jim-R earned 120 total points
ID: 38369354
I believe rindi hit the nail on the head with his comment on the machine hardware actually having support for XP.  If the machine has hardware designed for Win 7 64bit, it may never be able to function with XP because XP 32bit drivers simply don't exist for the hardware.  If the hardware didn't exist when the Win XP 32bit OS was around, it stands to reason no 32bit drivers were ever developed for that hardware.  As a result, many newer systems are not compatible with the older versions of Windows.

All other arguments regarding Windows Licensing are moot if there are no drivers for 32bit XP no matter what version you have.

The most likely workable scenario is to use a Win 7 version such as Pro that is licensed to run "XP mode"  Home Premium will not run XP mode by design.  Microsoft wants you to purchase the Pro version or better to be able to run XP mode.  Then the XP license is included with Win 7.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38372143
Hi everyone, and thanks for your suggestions! Have just tried to use the product key for Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (factory default) on my ISO-installed Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit (clean install from DVD that I burned myself from download from Digital River). It was not accepted: "The product key you have entered will not work with this edition of Windows 7."

Furthermore, I am not able to use the current installation of Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit to full extent because drivers are missing (can not, for example, use internet; I use another computer now to access internet).

The absolute best solution now seems to be what rindi suggested: extract the files from the iso, then delete the ei.cfg file from the extracted files, and create a new iso.

But how can I extract the files from the ISO? Is there any freeware I can use? Or do I have to purchase the software? Or can I follow the advice in this thread?:
  http://www.fanhow.com/knowhow:Change_Windows_7_Home_Premium_ISO_image_to_Ultimate_edition_41977072
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LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38372181
You can use 7-Zip to open the iso file and extract it's contents to your HD:

http://www.7-zip.org/

If you don't have the drivers, download them from the DELL site and install them.
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LVL 97

Assisted Solution

by:Lee W, MVP
Lee W, MVP earned 160 total points
ID: 38373005
Folks,

I think there are two things that should be done here because we are dealing with a gray area (to me) of licensing.

1. Call Microsoft regarding the right to use XP OEM on that system.  HISTORICALLY, my understanding is that OEM editions are for computers WITHOUT operating systems AND tied to the system for life.  This computer came with an operating system.  Therefore, you cannot install an operating system whose license says it's for computer without operating systems.

Further, altering the media, though there may be plenty of documentation online, in such a way to alter the editions installed is something I find quite questionable.  

BOTH These points should be addressed by the authority involved - MICROSOFT.  Not people claiming they understand what some lawyers would readily admit they don't (that includes myself).

2. Call Dell.  If you destroyed the recovery partition, call Dell and get recovery media.  Yes, it will likely cost you. But it shouldn't be very expensive and then you're fine.

This may seem like a technical question in the beginning, but it's really a "What rights does Microsoft grant me" and to that end, you need to keep in mind:
DISCLAIMER: Licensing advice offered here is a "best effort" and based on the understanding of the respondents. Licenses can change and we may not be aware of these changes or may misunderstand them. Further, licenses can differ by country and/or region and what we understand to be true in our region could be false in your region. "they told me on Experts-Exchange" will not be a valid defense in a software audit.  All licensing questions should be confirmed with the appropriate licensing authority (the maker of the software/issuer of the license).
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38374624
The very clear answer I received from Dell in Beijing, China (I finally got through to the right person who spoke perfect English and could give me confident answers on everything) is that Dell has no recovery media I can buy cheaply from them as my laptop's OS came preinstalled as OEM and not as retailed version. Further in Dell's answer, he said Dell has no product key to provide me with so I need to purchase a completely new Windows 7 Home Premium. Which sounds a bit strange though as there is a product key printed on the sticker under my laptop (or is that product key only possible to use for the OEM-version of Windows 7 Home Premium that was installed at the factory?) But still, shouldn't that product key work for any Windows 7 Home Premium (purchased as well as downloaded and burned as ISO)?
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LVL 84

Accepted Solution

by:
David Johnson, CD, MVP earned 480 total points
ID: 38374655
The best con men are very confident and you want to trust them. Dell does sell recovery media, and what it does is restore your computer to the factory image.. You can use that product key on any copy of windows 7 home premium. You are responsible for getting all of the drivers for your product.

Your machine may not auto-activate and you will have to go the phone route to activate

With OEM software one of the reasons it is cheap is that support is provided by the OEM manufacturer and not by Microsoft and it is not a perpetual license the software is licensed for the first computer it is activated on and lives and dies with the hardware. Hardware usually defined as the motherboard, this can be overridden on a case by case basis by Microsoft. (in case the motherboard dies)

With the major vendors all copies of a particular product are installed with the same product key and activated using the slic table. You are given a sticker with a different license key. This sticker is provided by Microsoft and can be used for re-installations.

The problem now is since it is an OEM key, you cannot get support from Microsoft and now since you are not using the OEM supplied media you may not get software support from the OEM manufacturer.  

As was mentioned before, you don't have downgrade rights for your OEM software.

as I made a mistake and installed Ultimate-version using a clean install with burned ISO,

Why did you do this? Oh well, it is a little late.. you may still have the DELL recovery partition and it should have an install.wim (it may be called winre.wim) which by using a boot disk with imagex you can apply to your computer and get it back to factory defaults. Unless you wiped this partition.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38374987
I was advised on another posting here at EE to make a clean install of Windows 7 Ultimate directly and not to go via the route install Home-edition first and then upgrade. It was not a wise advise, but too late now to have it undone.

But I know the recovery partition is not deleted, because when I visited Dell Service Center here in China, the Dell service agent showed me that recovery partition on my laptop (but with lines over it, which I think means it is hidden). Is there any way to access this with imagex? The next thing I try just must work, I can not afford next move I do also fails. So I am not certain what move to choose next: Try rindis suggestion (although I think I need to pay 45 $ for that rt7lite, and in the end it might still not work so could as well has bought a new Windows 7 Home Premium). Or should I try to use the (hidden?) recovery partition with imagex? Can't I use any other software, such as Acronis True Image Home 2012 (which I already own)?
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38375067
I received a file from a Chinese friend that is called fixwinre (together with explaining documents, only in Cinese language so I can't post them here). I thinks it's a Chinese tool, don't know if it can work for a Windows bought in Hong Kong.
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LVL 84

Assisted Solution

by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
David Johnson, CD, MVP earned 480 total points
ID: 38375214
lets back off a bit here.. you did a clean install of windows 7 ultimate. what is the problem with this installation?

from an elevated command prompt you can run diskpart in which you should see the OEM partition..
diskpart
list vol
select vol #  (# will match the number of the partition that you need)
assign           (this will give it a drive letter)
exit
change to that drive

do a dir /b >> directory.txt and paste the contents here.
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Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38375244
rrt7lite is free (I don't know where you saw that it costs 45$, but you can donate some $$ to them if you want to).

Dell uses a special mbr to get to the recovery partition. Possibly you have overwritten that with a vanilla one when you installed the new OS. As far as I know you can only restore the original Dell mbr if you have another similar Dell at your disposal. Then you can save that mbr to some media (there are various partition management tools you can use to save and restore the mbr), and then restore that mbr to your Dell. After that you should be able to start the recovery from that partition again.

The Dell Service Center can probably also restore the DELL mbr...

One other thing that can cause a recovery partition not to work, is a BIOS setting. Make sure the recovery or D2D option is turned on, if there is such a setting.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38375369
I run the commands in the elevated command prompt (assigned a drive letter etc.), but it seems all files in the folder Recovery has been deleted because when I in My computer open the recovery partition, after having used the elevated command prompt, all the files are 0 KB (although it says in My computer and in the elevated command prompt that there are only 4.36 GB free on the recovery partition of total 14.6 GB).

I've uploaded the textfile here.
directory.txt
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38375435
I checked the BIOS-settings now but there was no setting for turning the recovery on or off.
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LVL 84

Assisted Solution

by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
David Johnson, CD, MVP earned 480 total points
ID: 38375459
either you don't have permission
takeown /f H:\ /r /d y
or they are hidden files
H:\
attrib -h -s -r * /s

you should now be able to see them.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38375644
Change permission didn't work: "ERROR: The system cannot find the file specified."

But after I've made the files visible using your second string, I could view the files in the  recovery partition (F:)! Although these files have 0 KB: cd, dir, DRECOVERY, exit, Recovery.

Does this mean it will work now to recover using F8 during bootup?
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38375647
By the way, I received about 50 rows in this format after I made the files visible:

"Access denied - F:\Boot\cs-CZ\bootmgr.exe.mui". (Not exactly the same on all the rows,  but about the same.)
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
ID: 38375659
no you will have to look for the largest file it should be a few GB in size find it and report back the filename.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38375704
But all the files are small files (the largest 122 KB). No large file in the recovery partition.
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LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 38375726
Recovery won't work unless you restore the DELL mbr, so that is what you should do.
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LVL 84

Assisted Solution

by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
David Johnson, CD, MVP earned 480 total points
ID: 38375745
try a dir /ah /s from the root folder and look for these files again.. if nothing found..
try a dir/b /s >> output.txt and upload the text file here for us to look at.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38376660
Here comes the output for the listing of root directory.
output.txt
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38376678
I couldn't see anything in this output. Rindi, wonder if you could explain how I can restore the Dell mbr? What is that?: mbr.
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LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 38376688
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Expert Comment

by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
ID: 38377863
now we are getting somewhere. F:\Recovery\WindowsRE\winre.wim

C:\Windows\System32\Reagentc.exe /setreimage /path F:\Recovery\WindowsRE /target C:\Windows

now you should get the f8 recovery options.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd744280%28WS.10%29.aspx
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38378644
v3ofa, this is definitely on the right track now, I received a file called fixwinre two days ago from Dell Support together with several pages of instructions in Chinese language. Haven't tried that solution yet, will get some assistance today from a Chinese friend of mine.

I will try your solution now while I wait for my friend to come. Tried to type this in the elevated command prompt:

C:\Windows\System32\Reagentc.exe /setreimage /path F:\Recovery\WindowsRE /target C:\Windows

But received this error message:

"Cannot create a file when that file already exists."

Am I doing something wrong here? Do you mean I should type your two strings in the elevated command prompt, and then follow the instructions in Microsoft TechNet?:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd744280%28WS.10%29.aspx 

When I follow the instructions here at Microsoft TechNet, or to get the winre.wim to work, will I need two computers?
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38378668
I've had a look at the three Word-documents in Chinese language, and two of them only addres the prodedure to recover from the recovery image. The last Word-document deals with creation of a system recovery media. But I'm not clear as what Dell means I should do with the file they also provided me with: fixwinre.exe (which drive and folder to copy it to, anything more that needs to be done than merely copy the file into right folder and run it).
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38378685
ve3ofa, I tried to type this in the elevated command prompt:

C:\Windows\System32\Reagentc.exe /setreimage /path F:\Recovery\WindowsRE /target C:\Windows

But received this error message:

"REAGENTC.EXE: Operation failed: b7. Cannot create a file when that file already exists."
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LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38378908
Maybe that file is supposed to restore the Dell Master Boot Record (mbr)? Why don't you ask the people at Dell you got it from if it does that and if yes how it is used, and if not, that you must have the mbr restored and for that you need the original from Dell?
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LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
ID: 38378912
You do realize that you have 4 questions open for the same problem!
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38378962
Initially those four qestions were for different problems, but I have updated the people at those postings about the current situation and that these postings are a part of the major problem: the recovery partition that can't be used.

I got that file from Dell in south China where I live, and they are closed on weekends. I'm waiting for a friend to come and explain to me how to use this file. Dell Support in Beijing that I called said different: It's not possible, the recovery partition is deleted and I need to buy a new OS (probably didn't tried so much as Dell in south China gave me a file to use to get back the recovery partition).
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LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38379037
If you need this fast and without the help of Dell, you will have to try to get hold of another Dell PC (if possible one that was delivered with Windows 7 too) that has a recovery partition. Then you can as I mentioned earlier save the mbr of that other Dell to a file, and then you can restore that file to the mbr of your PC.

On the other hand, you should be able to use your trial installation of Windows 7 without problems for at least up to 90 days. If the 1st trial time is used up, you can rearm it to get another 30 days by starting a cmd prompt as administrator and entering slmgr /rearm. You can repeat that again after that month is up, and after that again.

If you can't connect to the internet and if other functions don't work, you haven't installed the PC's drivers for your OS. You must visit the Dell homepage, go to the drivers download page, select your PC model and OS, and then download those drivers, and after that you can install them and then it should be fully functional, with internet and all. Remember to install an AV software and all the windowsupdates after that. Once you have the system that far you should be able to use it and you'll also be able to plan your further action better and with less stress.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38379101
That would be a real relief, to get the trial Windows up working. I'm using a small netbook now for internet (ASUS EeePC 1000He), but it's extremely slow so it will take a long time to download all the drivers (37 drivers). The best first step now, wouldn't that be if I could download first and foremost the drivers necessary to use internet on my Dell laptop?

There are four drivers for "Communications" (all are for modems), and one driver for "Network" (think this is for Bluetooth). Do you think I will be able to use internet on my Dell after having downloaded these five drivers, so I can can continue with downloading the rest of the drivers from the Dell laptop?
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LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 920 total points
ID: 38379108
If there are chipset drivers, download those first, those are the ones to install first and most important. After that the network and the Graphic Card's drivers. Then you should have internet connectivity and you can download the sound and further drivers after that.
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Author Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38380939
The fix file I received from Dell Support in south China finally worked and I had my recovery partition back. I could not reply until now because I encountered new problems each step when I had recovered and had to take one step at a time. And then I couldn't upgrade to Ultimate version with the upgrade key but it also got solved in the end. I had to run updates of Ultimate-version which took half a day (I wanted all the language packages
which took half a day to download and install). And I had to try to find Dell Support in south China where I live and visit them personally. And I had to try to find a person at Dell Support in north China to talk with over the phone to see if this was warranty related and they could help me by visiting me. All that took time, and I couldn't reply until now.

The key thing is that I received an advice to do a clean install of Ultimate version, which I ignored the first time (which was right), but then the second time I listened to that advice and lost the recovery partition, which caused all the related problems. But even then, how could I be certain, for example, that the problem I had with not being able to access My Computer, was not a hardware failure? I could not know, in the course of events of all
small problems, know which one was related to which other problem.

So I have now upgraded to Ultimate-version and run all the updates, and got my recovery partition back.

I am not ignoring the experts advices, but after I received the wrong advice to skip the upgrade step and do a clean install of Ultimate-version directly, and also having conflicting advices from Dell Support (in north China: there is no solution, buy a new OS; in south China by personal visit: I received the fix file that finally solved everything and brought my recovery partition back), I really had to be careful which advice to follow next time. And also, I think that not many days has passed and you already say I am abandon questions and ignoring experts' advices?

If I, in my question, say I will do a factory recovery and then upgrade to Ultimate edition, I shouldn't be advised to skip the factory recovery and install Ultimate at once. It should be evident that as I clearly intend to do a factory recovery of Windows 7 Home ("What is the best way to first do a factory recover of Windows 7 Home 64-bit, and then upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit?"), and then upgrade, I will use an upgrade key (although I was too quick to follow the advice given to me the second time as I was getting desperate when nothing worked, and I didn't think myself). But I still was given wrong advice which led to the main problem: the loss of the recovery partition. I didn't follow this advice the first time but did the recovery first. I bought the physical box with the upgrade key in it in Hong Kong and did not receive it when doing the upgrade as you said either. I don't know if there are more than two ways to get the upgrade key (online or in physical box) and if there are any differences when doing the upgrade or if they can be used differently, but in my situation I already owned this upgrade key, having purchased it beforehand.
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Author Closing Comment

by:hermesalpha
ID: 38381051
Thanks all participant experts for taking time for this difficult question that was intertwined with several other questions, and that touched on areas regarding licensing as well as the technical aspects. This question, initially regarding install of 32-bit XP on a 64-bit Windows 7-machine, was brought back to the main problem as the exchanges developed: the recovery partition that could not be used. So because several of my questions during the past one week or so are related, I award the points that relate both to the subquestion as well as the main question.

This was a real emergency situation for me, so it was not possible to keep the different related problems together from the beginning as they turned up each after another
and I could not be sure where the end and where the head of this problem was, and if there were still other related problems. Thanks again for taking time to trying to find the best practical solution for me!
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