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frame alternative

Is there something "out there" that is a frame alternative?  Client doesn't want bottom of design (floor) to move when people scroll to read text.  The only solution i could think of is to create the site in a frame and those are satan's child.  Are there any other suggestions?

Here is what he is thinking...
http://screencast.com/t/oVYqsgzOrL
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nsitedesigns
Asked:
nsitedesigns
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3 Solutions
 
dimmergeekCommented:
You can use <div> tags to keep elements of a web page in a fixed location.
You can create a 'footer' style as follows:

.footer
{
    padding: 10px 0px 10px 0px;
    border: solid 2px #000000;
    background: #A9A9A9;
    position: fixed;
    bottom: 0px;
    width:960px;
}

this will create a section at the bottom of the page which will never move regardless of scrolling.

Open in new window


In your HTML,:

<div class="footer">
     Your HTML content here...
</div>

Open in new window

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nsitedesignsAuthor Commented:
Hmmm interesting.  I will have to check it out. So, does this solution give visitors to site a "bar" that they move to read contents of page?  If so, is there an option to select the color of the bar?  I know, picky picky but that is what client wants.
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Derek JensenCommented:
Virtually anything in a webpage is emulatible by some other means; this should give you a good start. :)
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
You simply put the content in a scrollable div

<div id="thediv"> all the content goes here</div>

then in the css:

#thediv  {
                overflow-y:scroll;
                height: /* whatever you need for the page*/
                width: /* whatever you need if you specify as a percentage it will be more fluid */
/* other options like border, color, font, etc are optional */
              }

That will look and act like an iframe without any of the negatives of an iframe.

Cd&
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dimmergeekCommented:
As coded, the 'bar' is just a section 960px wide.  You can set the width to be 100% then it will take up the whole width.  Bacground color can be set to any value using the CSS of the .footer element (right now set to #A9A9A9 for grey.
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
As for the illogical use of a colored scrollbar; this might help.


Cd&
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Kyle HamiltonData ScientistCommented:
Please tell your client that styling the scrollbars of the browser is one of the most asenine ideas in web design. It goes against every grain of usability - design your web page and leave my browser alone. Users shouldn't have to learn a new UI every time they open a browser window.

just my two cents... :)
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nsitedesignsAuthor Commented:
It's the scroll bar on his site.   I have seen some that are customized IN a website but that customization didn't effect the main scroll bar on my browser.  Aren't they two different things?
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Kyle HamiltonData ScientistCommented:
Not neccessarily. If you set a div to a small height with overflow:auto, you will get a native scroll bar. You can do all kinds of trickery in css and js to make that scroll bar appear custom, or you can remove it completely with overflow:hidden, and make your own scrollbar with js (this being one of the worst performing events of javascript: scrolling). It's not worth it.


I guess the most egregious abuse of scrollbars though, is styling the main window scrollbar - where people expect their trusty native (as ugly as some of them are) browser scrollbar.
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
Whether it is the main scrollbar, or a element scrollbar, it makes the page look like the work of an amateur, and lowers the credibility of the site.  I'm not telling you not to do it, but it will reflect on you and your standing as a developer.  

Cd&
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Derek JensenCommented:
The customer is always right...right? ;-)

That's not to say these aren't all valid(and coinciding) opinions, and you shouldn't tell the client to his face this is an overly complicated and worthless endeavor to raise the "flashiness" of his site; if that's his main goal, there are many other, easier, and better alternatives. :-)

However, I'd definitely recommend going the 'overflow: auto' route, if he insists on being a De De Dee...
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nsitedesignsAuthor Commented:
Well, he wasn't thinking of anything flashy. Just wanted it to be a blue bar like the blue bar under his navigation button.  I will talk with him about dropping the customization and see if it hits the fan or not.
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Derek JensenCommented:
That makes sense; I'd suggest making up an example div to show him it looks (relatively) the same. Oftentimes, if the client is shown something that *looks* the same, they don't really care *how* it's made. :-)
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nsitedesignsAuthor Commented:
thanks all
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